Where Art Belongs/ Exhibition as Medium

From 28 Oct 2011 5:30 PM
To 29 Oct 2011 4:00 PM
more info
CoCA Massey and City Gallery Wellington
Museum Building and City Gallery

Where (and how) can contemporary art connect with people to have the most relevance and meaning now? Two events, a back-to-back lecture and a day symposium will explore these topics. Guests include international writer and art critic Chris Kraus and artist/curator/writer Paul O’Neill, alongside New Zealand artists and curators.

This event is for people who are interested in how art and audiences can connect, especially outside of established gallery and museum spaces and exhibition structures. What types of strategies are artists and curators using locally and internationally to engender more located, meaningful and provocative types of encounters?

Back-to-back evening lectures:

Friday 28 October 2011

5.30 – 7.45pm

City Gallery Wellington

Chris Kraus

Paul O’Neill

Day symposium:

Museum Building Theatrette, Room 10A02

College of Creative Arts, Massey University, Wellington

Saturday 29 October 2011

10.30 am – 4pm

Admission is free to both events. A koha is invited for lunch on Saturday 29 October. Please reserve a place for the symposium.

For information about the evening lecture at City Gallery please contact kirsty.glengarry@wmt.org.nz

For information about, and to reserve a place for the day symposium please contact Ilka Kapica at i.kapica@massey.ac.nz or Heather Galbraith h.galbraith@massey.ac.nz

A Litmus Research Initiative project. Lecture in collaboration with City Gallery Wellington.

Supported by College of Creative Arts, Massey University Wellington. Chris Kraus’s trip to New Zealand is supported by Artspace, Auckland

Biographies/context:

Chris Kraus is the author of Video Green: Los Angeles Art and the Triumph of Nothingness and the novels Aliens and Anorexia, I Love Dick, and Torpor. The 2007 recipient of the Frank Mather Award in Art Criticism and a 2010 Warhol Foundation Arts Writer’s grant, she has taught art writing in graduate programs at University of California, Irvine, Art Center College, San Francisco Art Institute, and European Graduate School.

Her latest book, published by MIT Press Where Art Belongs examines artistic enterprises of the past decade that reclaim the use of lived time as a material in the creation of visual art. In four interlinked essays Kraus examines the uses of boredom, poetry, privatized prisons, community art, corporate philanthropy, vertically integrated manufacturing, and discarded utopias, revealing the surprising persistence of microcultures within the matrix.

Chronicling the sometimes doomed but persistently heroic efforts of small groups of artists to reclaim public space and time, Where Art Belongs describes the trend towards collectivity manifested in the visual art world during the past decade, and the small forms of resistance to digital disembodiment and the hegemony of the entertainment/media/culture industry. For all its faults, Kraus argues, the art world remains the last frontier for the desire to live differently.

Chris Kraus’s trip to New Zealand is supported by Artspace, Auckland and the International Visitors Programme, through Creative New Zealand Toi Aotearoa.

Paul O'Neill is an independent curator, artist and writer based in Bristol. Until recently, he was the Great Western Research Alliance (GWR) Research Fellow in Commissioning Contemporary Art with Situations at the University of the West of England, Bristol. Paul has curated or co-curated more than fifty exhibition projects including: We are Grammar, Pratt Manhattan Gallery, New York (2011); Coalesce: happenstance, SMART, Amsterdam (2009); D.B, Four Gallery, Dublin (2008); Tape Runs Out, Text and Work Gallery, Bournemouth (2007); Intermittent, Gallery for One, Dublin (2007); Making Do, The Lab, Dublin (2007); Our Day Will Come, Zoo Art Fair, London (2006); General Idea: Selected Retrospective, Project, Dublin (2006); Mingle-Mangled, as part of Cork Caucus, Cork (2005); La La Land, Project, Dublin (2005); Coalesce: The Remix, Redux, London (2005); Tonight, Studio Voltaire, London, (2004); Coalesce: With All Due Intent at Model and Niland Art Gallery, Sligo (2004); Are We There Yet? Glassbox, Paris (2000) and Passports, Zaeta Gallery of Contemporary Art, Warsaw (1998).

He is an associated visiting lecturer on the de Appel Curatorial Programme and on the MFA Curating, Goldsmiths, London. His writing has been published in many books, catalogues, journals and magazines and he is a regular contributor to Art Monthly. He is reviews editor for Art and the Public Sphere Journal and on the editorial board of The Exhibitionist and The Journal of Curatorial Studies. He is editor of the curatorial anthology, Curating Subjects (2007), and co-editor of Curating and the Educational Turn with Mick Wilson (2010), both published by de Appel and Open Editions (Amsterdam and London), and Locating the Producers: Durational Approaches to Public Art (Amsterdam, Vaiz, 2011) edited with Claire Doherty.

He is currently working on an authored book with MIT Press, entitled The Culture of Curating, Curating Culture(s), (2012). He recently took part in Iteration:Again, Hobart, Tasmania, with his project 'Our Day Will Come' - A free-school project within a school.

Paul O’Neill is brought to the Southern Hemisphere through the Iteration: Again project, Tasmania, curated by David Cross. His trip to New Zealand is funded through College of Creative Arts, Massey University.

Biographies/context:

Chris Kraus is the author of Video Green: Los Angeles Art and the Triumph of Nothingness and the novels Aliens and Anorexia, I Love Dick, and Torpor. The 2007 recipient of the Frank Mather Award in Art Criticism and a 2010 Warhol Foundation Arts Writer’s grant, she has taught art writing in graduate programs at University of California, Irvine, Art Center College, San Francisco Art Institute, and European Graduate School.

Her latest book, published by MIT Press Where Art Belongs examines artistic enterprises of the past decade that reclaim the use of lived time as a material in the creation of visual art. In four interlinked essays Kraus examines the uses of boredom, poetry, privatized prisons, community art, corporate philanthropy, vertically integrated manufacturing, and discarded utopias, revealing the surprising persistence of microcultures within the matrix.

Chronicling the sometimes doomed but persistently heroic efforts of small groups of artists to reclaim public space and time, Where Art Belongs describes the trend towards collectivity manifested in the visual art world during the past decade, and the small forms of resistance to digital disembodiment and the hegemony of the entertainment/media/culture industry. For all its faults, Kraus argues, the art world remains the last frontier for the desire to live differently.

Chris Kraus’s trip to New Zealand is supported by Artspace, Auckland and the International Visitors Programme, through Creative New Zealand Toi Aotearoa.

Paul O'Neill is an independent curator, artist and writer based in Bristol. Until recently, he was the Great Western Research Alliance (GWR) Research Fellow in Commissioning Contemporary Art with Situations at the University of the West of England, Bristol. Paul has curated or co-curated more than fifty exhibition projects including: We are Grammar, Pratt Manhattan Gallery, New York (2011); Coalesce: happenstance, SMART, Amsterdam (2009); D.B, Four Gallery, Dublin (2008); Tape Runs Out, Text and Work Gallery, Bournemouth (2007); Intermittent, Gallery for One, Dublin (2007); Making Do, The Lab, Dublin (2007); Our Day Will Come, Zoo Art Fair, London (2006); General Idea: Selected Retrospective, Project, Dublin (2006); Mingle-Mangled, as part of Cork Caucus, Cork (2005); La La Land, Project, Dublin (2005); Coalesce: The Remix, Redux, London (2005); Tonight, Studio Voltaire, London, (2004); Coalesce: With All Due Intent at Model and Niland Art Gallery, Sligo (2004); Are We There Yet? Glassbox, Paris (2000) and Passports, Zaeta Gallery of Contemporary Art, Warsaw (1998).

He is an associated visiting lecturer on the de Appel Curatorial Programme and on the MFA Curating, Goldsmiths, London. His writing has been published in many books, catalogues, journals and magazines and he is a regular contributor to Art Monthly. He is reviews editor for Art and the Public Sphere Journal and on the editorial board of The Exhibitionist and The Journal of Curatorial Studies. He is editor of the curatorial anthology, Curating Subjects (2007), and co-editor of Curating and the Educational Turn with Mick Wilson (2010), both published by de Appel and Open Editions (Amsterdam and London), and Locating the Producers: Durational Approaches to Public Art (Amsterdam, Vaiz, 2011) edited with Claire Doherty.

He is currently working on an authored book with MIT Press, entitled The Culture of Curating, Curating Culture(s), (2012). He recently took part in Iteration:Again, Hobart, Tasmania, with his project 'Our Day Will Come' - A free-school project within a school.

Paul O’Neill is brought to the Southern Hemisphere through the Iteration: Again project, Tasmania, curated by David Cross. His trip to New Zealand is funded through College of Creative Arts, Massey University.

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