Dr Matt Williams staff profile picture

Contact details+64 (09) 414 0800  ext. 43117

Dr Matt Williams BBS, GradDipArts, MA(Hons)

Lecturer

School of Psychology

I am a Lecturer in the School of Psychology, and have recently completed my PhD. My primary interest is in the use of quantitative research methods in the social sciences. I'm especially interested in how psychological research methods can be used to study the relationship between human behaviour and climate change.

Professional

Contact details

  • Ph: +64 9 414 0800 x43117
    Location: 3.33, School of Psychology
    Campus: Auckland

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Business Studies - Massey University (2005)
  • Graduate Diploma in Arts - Massey (2006)
  • Master of Arts (Honours) - Massey (2010)

Research Expertise

Research Interests

  • The interface between psychology and climate change research
  • Bayesian data analysis in psychology
  • Psychometric theory and analysis

Thematics

Resource Development and Management, Health and Well-being

Area of Expertise

Field of research codes
Applied Statistics (010401): Mathematical Sciences (010000):
Personality, Abilities and Assessment (170109): Psychological Methodology, Design and Analysis (170110): Psychology (170100): Psychology And Cognitive Sciences (170000):
Statistics (010400)

Keywords

Multivariate data analysis, psychometric theory and analysis, climate change and psychology.

Research Projects

Summary of Research Projects

PositionCurrentCompleted
Project Leader10

Research Outputs

Journal

Furness, K., Williams, MN., Veale, JF., & Gardner, DH. (2017). Maximising potential: The psychological effects of the youth development programme project K. New Zealand journal of psychology. 46(1), 14-23
[Journal article]Authored by: Gardner, D., Williams, M.
Towers, A., Williams, MN., Hill, SR., Philipp, MC., & Flett, R. (2016). What makes for the most intense regrets? Comparing the effects of several theoretical predictors of regret intensity. Frontiers in Psychology. 7(DEC)
[Journal article]Authored by: Flett, R., Hill, S., Philipp, M., Towers, A., Williams, M.
Williams, MN., Hill, SR., & Spicer, J. (2016). Erratum to: Will climate change increase or decrease suicide rates? The differing effects of geographical, seasonal, and irregular variation in temperature on suicide incidence (Climatic Change, 130, (2015), 519-528, 10.1007/s10584-015-1371-9). Climatic Change. 134(1-2), 341
[Journal article]Authored by: Hill, S., Williams, M.
Veale, JF., & Williams, MN. (2016). The psychometric properties of a brief version of the systemizing quotient. European Journal of Psychological Assessment.
[Journal article]Authored by: Williams, M.
Williams, MN., Hill, SR., & Spicer, J. (2016). Do hotter temperatures increase the incidence of self-harm hospitalisations?. Psychology, Health and Medicine. 21(2), 226-235
[Journal article]Authored by: Hill, S., Williams, M.
Williams, MN., Hill, SR., & Spicer, J. (2015). The relationship between temperature and assault in New Zealand. Climatic Change. 132(4), 559-573
[Journal article]Authored by: Hill, S., Williams, M.
Williams, MN., Hill, SR., & Spicer, J. (2015). Will climate change increase or decrease suicide rates? The differing effects of geographical, seasonal, and irregular variation in temperature on suicide incidence. Climatic Change. 130(4), 519-528
[Journal article]Authored by: Hill, S., Williams, M.
Williams, MN., Grajales, CAG., & Kurkiewicz, D. (2013). Assumptions of multiple regression: Correcting two misconceptions. Practical Assessment, Research and Evaluation. 18(9), 1-14
[Journal article]Authored by: Williams, M.
Williams, MN., Hill, SR., & Spicer, J. (2013). In response to "Temperature and violent crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and implications of climate change". Western Journal of Emergency Medicine. 14(5), 567
[Journal article]Authored by: Hill, S., Williams, M.
Williams, MWM., & Williams, MN. (2012). Academic Dishonesty, Self-Control, and General Criminality: A Prospective and Retrospective Study of Academic Dishonesty in a New Zealand University. Ethics and Behavior. 22(2), 89-112
[Journal article]Authored by: Williams, M., Williams, M.
Williams, MN., & Jones, LM. (2012). Validating a measure of children's monitoring-blunting coping styles in dental situations. Psychology, Health and Medicine. 17(3), 274-284
[Journal article]Authored by: Jones, L., Williams, M.

Thesis

Williams, MN. (2016). How well do psychologists' research methods equip them to identify the impacts of climate change on behaviour? A methodological investigation with particular reference to the effects of temperature on violent behaviour. (Doctoral Thesis)
[Doctoral Thesis]Authored by: Williams, M.
Williams, MN. (2010). Coping in the chair: A validation study of the Monitoring Blunting Dental Scale. (Master's Thesis)
[Masters Thesis]Authored by: Williams, M.

Conference

Smith, J., Buttle, H., van Ommen, C., & Williams, MN. (2016, September). Placing mindfulness under the lens: A network analysis. Presented at New Zealand Psychological Society Annual Conference. Wellington, New Zealand.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Buttle, H., Van Ommen, C., Williams, M.
Williams, MN., Furness, K., Veale, JF., & Gardner, DH. (2016, September). The effects of Project K on the wellbeing of adolescents: A multilevel model analysis. Presented at New Zealand Psychological Society Annual Conference. Wellington, New Zealand.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Gardner, D., Williams, M.
Williams, MN. (2016). The robust negative relationship between mean temperature and national suicide rates. Poster session presented at the meeting of Association for Psychological Science Annual Convention. Chicago, IL, USA
[Conference Poster]Authored by: Williams, M.
Williams, MN. (2016, May). Bayes factor null hypothesis tests are still null hypothesis tests. Presented at Modern Modeling Methods (M3) conference. Storrs, CT, USA.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Williams, M.
Williams, MN., Hill, SR., & Spicer, J. (2015, August). Will climate change increase or decrease suicide rates?. Presented at NZPsS Annual Conference. Hamilton, New Zealand.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Hill, S., Williams, M.
Williams, M., Towers, ., Philipp, MC., & Hill, S. (2014). Predictably regretful: A comparison of the effects of time, domain, justification, and life rule contradiction on the intensity of regrets.. In New Zealand Psychological Society Annual Conference: Ka tū, ka oho - Te matai hinengaro me te ao hou: Psychology in a Changing World: Programme(pp. 51 - 51). , New Zealand Psychological Society Annual Conference: Ka tū, ka oho - Te matai hinengaro me te ao hou: Psychology in a Changing World New Zealand: The New Zealand Psychological Society
[Conference Abstract]Authored by: Hill, S., Philipp, M., Towers, A., Williams, M.
Williams, MN., & Hill, SR. (2013). Will hotter temperatures increase violent crime rates? The challenges of forecasting behavioural response to climate change. Poster session presented at the meeting of The New Zealand Climate Change Conference 2013. Palmerston North, New Zealand
[Conference Poster]Authored by: Hill, S., Williams, M.
Williams, M., & Jones, LM. (2010, July). Interventions for children’s dental anxiety: Validating a coping styles scale. Presented at New Zealand Psychological Society Annual Conference 2010: Psychology for a sustainable Future A hinengaro ma tokana a mua. Rotorua, New Zealand.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Jones, L., Williams, M.

Supervision and Teaching

Summary of Doctoral Supervision

PositionCurrentCompleted
CoSupervisor20

Courses Coordinated

  • 175.746 Psychological Research: Multivariate Data Analysis
  • 230.310 Tu Tira Mai: Practising Engagement

Media and Links

Media

  • 21 Jun 2015 - Newspaper
    New research finds connection between climate and
    An article in the Sunday Star Times entitled "New research finds connection between climate and crime" discussed my journal article "The relationship between temperature and assault in New Zealand".
  • 01 Dec 2016 - Online
    Interview:"Who Cares? What's the point?" (podcast)
    I was interviewed on Sarb Johal's "Who cares? What's the point?" podcast, with the episode focusing on my research on climate change and human aggression.
  • 01 Dec 2016 - Online
    Interview: "Who cares? What's the point?" podcast
    My research on climate change and assault resulted in an interview on Sarb Johal's "Who cares? What's the point?" podcast. The interview was subsequently covered on sciblogs.co.nz, which is New Zealan

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