Dr Sarah Shultz staff profile picture

Contact details +64 (04) 801 5799  ext. 63496

Dr Sarah Shultz PhD, ATC

Senior Lecturer

School of Sport, Exercise and Nutrition

Associate Dean - International

My research interests involve the examination of orthopaedic complications associated with paediatric obesity during exercise interventions, specifically focusing on strategies to minimize injury and promote appropriate exercise for obese youth. Current research goals concentrate on the immediate and long-term implications of paediatric obesity on the musculoskeletal system and biomechanics of movement as it relates to exercise treatment interventions, with projects identifying both traditional and non-traditional forms of physical activity that simultaneously improve fitness and decrease risk of injury.

Professional

Contact details

  • Ph: +64 4 801 5799 (ext 63496)
    Location: 4C06b, Block 4
    Campus: Wellington

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Arts, Exercise and Sports Science - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA) (2003)
  • Masters of Education, Kinesiology - Temple University (USA) (2005)
  • Doctor of Philosophy, Kinesiology - Temple University (USA) (2008)
  • Athletic Training Certification - National Athletic Trainer’s Association Board of Certification (2003)

Research Expertise

Research Interests

My research interests involve the examination of orthopedic complications associated with pediatric obesity during exercise interventions, specifically focusing on strategies to minimize injury and promote efficacious exercise programs for this population. I believe that an effective weight management strategy is one that understands the obstacles which prevent an obese child from participating in physical activity (e.g., musculoskeletal pain and injury, cardiovascular restrictions, balance and motor control incompetence), and then diminishes the prevalence of those obstacles. My current research goals concentrate on the immediate and long-term implications of obesity on the musculoskeletal system and biomechanics of movement as it relates to exercise treatment interventions, with the objective of identifying both traditional and non-traditional forms of physical activity that simultaneously improve fitness and decrease risk of injury.

Thematics

Health and Well-being

Area of Expertise

Field of research codes
Biomechanics (110601): Human Movement and Sports Science (110600): Medical And Health Sciences (110000)

Keywords

Clinical Biomechanics; Gait Analysis; Child Obesity; Lower Extremity Function

Research Projects

Summary of Research Projects

Position Current Completed
Project Leader 2 9

Current Projects

Project Title: New Zealand National Biomechanics Day: FORCE is needed to start a MOVEMENT (Unlocking Curious Minds)

Date Range: 2017 - 2017

Funding Body: Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment

Project Team:

Research Outputs

Journal

Kung, SM., Fink, PW., Legg, SJ., Ali, A., & Shultz, SP. (2017). What factors determine the preferred gait transition speed in humans? A review of the triggering mechanisms.. Hum Mov Sci. 57, 1-12
[Journal article]Authored by: Ali, A., Fink, P., Legg, S., Shultz, S.

Supervision and Teaching

Summary of Doctoral Supervision

Position Current Completed
Supervisor 2 0
CoSupervisor 3 0

Current Doctoral Supervision

Supervisor of:

  • Stacey Kung - PhD
    The effects of body size on the determinants of gait transitions in children
  • Mostafa Yaghoubi - PhD
    Understanding the biomechanics of underwater exercise: An option for weight management

CoSupervisor of:

  • Carla Van der Merwe - PhD
    The Effect of Minimalistic Shoes On Landing Mechanics And Knee And Ankle Stability During Netball Match Play
  • Victoria Chinn - PhD
    A Multidisciplinary Approach to Improving Women's Health
  • Wendy O'Brien - PhD
    Physical activity patterns of women from Aotearoa New Zealand women: Physical activity as a predictor of body composition and metabolic health

Massey Contact Centre Mon - Fri 8:30am to 5:00pm 0800 MASSEY (+64 6 350 5701) TXT 5222 contact@massey.ac.nz Web chat Staff Alumni News Māori @ Massey