Dr Krushil Watene staff profile picture

Contact details +64 (09) 414 0800  ext. 43495

Dr Krushil Watene PhD, MA(hons)

Senior Lecturer

School of Humanities

My broad areas of research are moral and political philosophy. I’m interested in concepts like: equality, community, freedom, and rights. I’m interested in how we improve people’s lives (well-being) and how we make society and the world just (social and global justice). Much of my work is written from the perspective of the ‘capability approach’. As a theory of well-being, the capability approach tells us that we should be concerned with what people are able to do and be (our capabilities to function). We improve people's lives by expanding their real opportunities to live the kinds of lives they value and have reason to value.

My work also crosses over into development studies – particularly ‘Development Ethics’ which asks questions like: What should the ends and means of development be? Is economic wealth all that matters? How does policy most usefully reflect and capture what we have reason to value?

I’m also committed to indigenous and pasifika peoples' perspectives. I’m interested in the contribution of Māori justice concepts to global justice theorising, as well as Māori and Pasifika health and development policies. I take a keen interest particularly in the development needs and aspirations of my own hapū and iwi.

More about me...View less...

Professional

Contact details

  • Location: AT2.64, Atrium Building
    Campus: Albany

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy - University of Saint Andrews (2011)
  • Master of Arts with hons - University of Auckland (2006)

Prizes and Awards

  • MURF Early Career Award - Massey University Research Fund (2017)

Research Expertise

Research Interests

Philosophy: Contemporary Moral and Political Philosophy; Applied Ethics; Theories of social and global justice; well-being; the Capability Approach; Maori social justice concepts

Development Ethics: The Human Development and Capability Approach; Indigenous Development; indigenous well-being; sustainable development

Area of Expertise

Field of research codes
Applied Ethics (220100): Environmental Philosophy (220303): Ethical Theory (220305): Human Rights and Justice Issues (220104): Other Philosophy and Religious Studies (229900): Philosophy (220300): Philosophy And Religious Studies (220000): Philosophy and Religious Studies not elsewhere classified (229999):
Political Science (160600): Political Theory and Political Philosophy (160609): Studies In Human Society (160000)

Keywords

Philosophy: Contemporary Moral and Political Philosophy; Applied Ethics; Theories of social and global justice; well-being; the Capability Approach; Maori social justice concepts

Development Ethics: The Human Development and Capability Approach; Indigenous Development; indigenous well-being; sustainable development

Research Projects

Summary of Research Projects

Position Current Completed
Project Leader 3 2

Current Projects

Project Title: Exploring Maori Social Justice Concepts

What makes society just? Plato's answers tend to be thought of as fundamentally part of our philosophical heritage: he provides a framework for discussion which we generally accept as the precursor to our modern society. But what would Plato's Republic have sounded like if Plato had been M?ori? What if Plato himself had taken ideas that are basic to M?ori society as his starting point? What kind of approach to social justice would we have inherited? This project provides the philosophical research required to articulate an approach to social justice grounded in M?ori concepts. This project breaks new ground in two important ways: firstly, by introducing the first M?ori approach to social justice into mainstream justice theorising; secondly, by bringing this approach explicitly into conversation with other indigenous concepts, and western theories of justice. This project has the potential to create shifts in some of the foundation of contemporary political philosophy, initiating a new framework for global justice theorising.
Read Project Description Hide Project Description

Date Range: 2017 - 2020

Funding Body: Royal Society of New Zealand

Project Team:

Project Title: NSC - Mauri Whenua Ora (Our Land & Water National Science Challenge)

Date Range: 2016 - 2019

Funding Body: University of Otago

Project Team:

Research Outputs

Book

Watene, KPM. (2018). Perspectives non-occidentales sur la justice distributive. In P. Savidan (Ed.) Dictionnaire des inegalites et de la justice sociale. : Presses Universitaires de France
[Chapter]Authored by: Watene, K.
Watene, KPM. (2013). Indigenous visions for sustainable development law? Continuing the conversation. In K. Bosselman, P. Taylor, & D. Grinlinton (Eds.) Environmental Law for a Sustainable Society,. (pp. 131 - 142). Auckland: New Zealand Centre for Environment Law
[Chapter]Authored by: Watene, K.

Report

Kawharu, M., & Watene, KPM. (2015). Whakataunga me ngā Wawata: Findings and Aspirations. ( Report No. 1).
[Commissioned Report]Authored by: Watene, K.
Watene, KPM. (2014). Whanau capabilities: Needs and aspirations. ( Report No. 3).
[Commissioned Report]Authored by: Watene, K.

Conference

Watene, KPM.Kaupapa Maori and philosophizing: Insights for the capability approach. . Capetown, South Africa
[Conference Paper]Authored by: Watene, K.

Media and Links

Other Links

Massey Contact Centre Mon - Fri 8:30am to 5:00pm 0800 MASSEY (+64 6 350 5701) TXT 5222 contact@massey.ac.nz Web chat Staff Alumni News Māori @ Massey