Dr Jeong Park staff profile picture

Contact details +64 (06) 356 9099  ext. 84715

Dr Jeong Park BA, MS, PhD

Senior Lecturer in Mammalian Biochemistry

Institute of Fundamental Sciences

EDUCATION

Rutgers University - NJ, USA                                                                      

Ph.D., Graduate program in Cell and Developmental Biology

Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology - Seoul, Korea                             

Master of Science in Biological Science and Engineering  

 

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE  

?          Senior Lecturer, Massey University at Palmerston North, New Zealand                                           2009 - present  

?          Research Associate, Rockefeller University, NY, USA                                                                         2003 - 2009

?          Research Staff, Princeton University, NJ, USA                                                                                  1999 - 2003

?          PhD Student, Rutgers, The State University of NJ                                                                             1994-1999

?          Assistant Manager, R&D Department, Daewoon Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd.                                          1991-1994

?          MS Student, KAIST                                                                                                                           1989-1991

 

TEACHING

  122.703           Gene Expression (teaching area: Transcription factors and cancer)

122.233           Metabolic Biochemistry (course coordinator, teaching area: regulation of metabolism and signal  transduction         pathways)

203.303           Gene Regulation (teaching area: transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes including epigenetics)  

203.300           DNA technology (teaching area: Recombination and Transposition)

 

 

GRANT AWARDS

?          Genesis Oncology Trust Cancer grant                                                                                  2013 - 2014

?          Massey University Research Fund                                                                                         2013

?          PNMRF Cancer grant                                                                                                           2011 – 2012

?          Massey University Research Fund                                                                                         2010 – 2011

?          PNMRF Summer Scholarship for post-graduates                                                                  2009 – 2013

 

PUBLICATIONS

1.         Tian Yang, Christopher Burrows, and Jeong hyeon Park* (2013) Development of a tetracycline-inducible lentiviral vector with an instant regulatory system. Manuscript submitted and Under review

2.         Jeong hyeon Park* et.al (2013) PPM1B is a negative regulator of replicative cellular senescence of human IMR-90 fibroblasts. Manuscript submitted and under review.

 

3.         Kangmoon Lee, Zin Zee Lau, Courtney Meredith and Jeong hyeon Park* (2012) Decrease of p400 ATPase complex and loss of H2A.Z within the p21 promoter occur in senescent IMR-90 human fibroblasts. Mech. Ageing dev. 133, 686-694   * corresponding author

4.         Jeong hyeon Park* and Natisha Magan (2011) Reverse Transcriptase-coupled Quantitative Real Time PCR Analysis of Cell-free Transcription on the Chromatin-assembled p21 Promoter. PLOS One, 6 (8): e23617 *corresponding author

5.         Jeong hyeon Park* et.al (2011) The GAS41-PP2Cβ complex dephosphorylates p53 at serine 366 and regulates its stability. J. Biol. Chem. 286, 10911-10917 *corresponding author

6.         Jeong hyeon Park, Xiao-Jian Sun, and Robert G. Roeder (2010) The SANT domain of p400 ATPase represses acetyltransferase activity and coactivator function of TIP60 in basal p21 gene expression. Mol. Cell. Biol. 30, 2750-2761

7.         Jeong hyeon Park and Robert G. Roeder (2006) GAS41 is required for repression of the p53 tumor suppressor pathway during normal cellular proliferation. Mol. Cell. Biol. 26, 4006-4016

8.         Mikhail   A. Nikiforov*, Sanjay Chandriani*, Jeong hyeon Park*, Lulia Kotenko, Dina Matheos, Anna Johnsson, Steven B. McMahon and Michael D. Cole (2002) TRRAP-dependent and TRRAP-independent transcriptional activation by the Myc oncoprotein. Mol. Cell. Biol. 22, 5054-5063 *equal contributors

9.       Jeong hyeon Park, Marcelo A. Wood and Michael D. Cole (2002) BAF53 forms three distinct nuclear complexes and functions as a Critical c-Myc interacting nuclear cofactor for oncogenic transformation. Mol. Cell. Biol. 22, 1307-1316

10.      Jeong hyeon Park, Sudeesha Kunjibettu, Steven B. McMahon, and Michael D. Cole (2001) The ATM- related domain of TRRAP is required for histone acetyltransferases recruitment and Myc-dependent oncogenesis. Genes & Dev. 15, 1619-1624

I am a Senior Lecturer in Mammalian Biochemistry at Massey University, Palmerston North.

I studied chromatin remodeling/modifying complexes in conjunction with the c-Myc oncogenic transcription factor during my postdoctoral training with Professor Michael D. Cole. Then, I joined to the Professor Robert Roeder’s Lab at Rockefeller University to extend my studies in the transcriptional regulation of eukaryotic genome with regard to the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. Currently I have three major research topics that are relevant to basic cancer biolgoy and biochemistry.

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Professional

Contact details

  • Ph: +64 6 356 9099 extn. 84715
    Location: C3.11, Science Tower
    Campus: Turitea

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Agriculture - Korea University (1989)
  • Master of Science - Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (1991)
  • PhD - Rutgers University (1999)

Research Expertise

Research Interests

In vitro epigenetic studies in cell free system

The compaction of eukaryotic DNA within chromatin structures allows intricate multilevel regulatory response to diverse environmental signals through various chromatin modifications. The epigenetic regulatory mechanisms of gene expression include post-translational modifications of histone tails and specific incorporation of histone variants such as H2A.Z into the genome. We are interested in recapitulating p21 gene regulation with purified recombinant proteins and artificially assembled chromatin templates in test tubes. Currently, we are investigating MSK1 serine/threonine kinase that is known to be a histone H3 serine 10/28 kinase and that has been implicated in cancer, inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. To find the phosphorylation sites on MSK1 being essentially required for MSK1 targeting to the promoter, we have established the system to generate 36 different mutations on MSK1 phosphorylation sites. Ultimately we will attempt to identify gain-of-function mutations of MSK1 that will contribute to the p53-dependent transcriptional activation and to a pathogenic mechanism of neurodegenerative disorders.  

 

  p400 ATP-dependent chromatin remodeller in DNA damage response

The TIP60 complex contains two major enzyme subunits among 16 subunit members. TIP60 is a histone acetyltransferase that plays diverse roles in DNA damage responses, DNA double strand break repair, and transcriptional regulation. The other enzyme, p400, is an ATPase that serves as an ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling enzyme. Our recent studies demonstrate that a SWI3-ADA2-N-CoR-TFIIIB (SANT) domain of p400 binds directly to the TIP60 and blocks both its enzymatic activity and p53-dependent coactivator function. We are currently investigating how p400 plays a role in regulating ATM serine/threonine kinase and TIP60 during DNA damage response and repair processes.

PPM1B in regulating p53 tumor suppressor

We recently identified the novel interaction of a brain cancer gene, GAS41 in potentially regulating Protein Phosphatase 2Cβ (PPM1B). To extend our finding, we are investigating the hypothesis that PPM1B is a critical regulator of cellular senescence. By using the lentiviral shRNA-mediated knockdown, we will attempt to see if the alteration of PPM1B levels or its regulator can suppress a brain tumor cell growth.

Thematics

Health and Well-being

Area of Expertise

Field of research codes
Biochemistry and Cell Biology (060100): Biological Sciences (060000):
Cancer Cell Biology (111201): Cancer Genetics (111203):
Cell Development, Proliferation and Death (060103): Enzymes (060107): Epigenetics (incl. Genome Methylation and Epigenomics) (060404): Genetics (060400):
Medical And Health Sciences (110000): Oncology and Carcinogenesis (111200):
Proteomics and Intermolecular Interactions (excl. Medical Proteomics) (060109): Signal Transduction (060111): Synthetic Biology (060113)

Keywords

Present research/professional specialty

My expertise includes basic cancer biology, protein biochemistry and epigenetic gene regulation. I am interested in DNA damage response focusing on the p53 tumor suppressor protein whose mutations or mis-regulations are major triggers in almost every form of human cancers. My group currently investigates p53-dependent eukaryotic gene regulation, post-translational modifications, and DNA damage-mediated signal transduction pathways. By combining tissue culture system with powerful biochemistry tools, my research group is looking for molecular targets to sensitize cancer cells to current chemo- and radio-therapy.

Research Projects

Summary of Research Projects

Position Current Completed
Project Leader 1 11

Research Outputs

Journal

Smith, RJ., Savoian, MS., Weber, LE., & Park, JH. (2016). Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) interacts with p400 ATPase for an efficient DNA damage response. BMC Molecular Biology. 17(1)
[Journal article]Authored by: Park, J., Savoian, M.
Jung, TH., Park, JH., Jeon, WM., & Han, KS. (2015). Butyrate modulates bacterial adherence on LS174T human colorectal cells by stimulating mucin secretion and MAPK signaling pathway. Nutrition Research and Practice. 9(4), 343-349
[Journal article]Authored by: Park, J.
Yang, T., Burrows, C., & Park, JH. (2014). Development of a doxycycline-inducible lentiviral plasmid with an instant regulatory feature. Plasmid. 72(1), 29-35
[Journal article]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH., Hale, TK., Smith, RJ., & Yang, T. (2014). PPM1B depletion induces premature senescence in human IMR-90 fibroblasts. Mechanisms of Ageing and Development. 138(1), 45-52
[Journal article]Authored by: Hale, T., Park, J.
Lee, K., Lau, ZZ., Meredith, C., & Park, JH. (2012). Decrease of p400 ATPase complex and loss of H2A.Z within the p21 promoter occur in senescent IMR-90 human fibroblasts. Mechanisms of Ageing and Development. 133(11-12), 686-694
[Journal article]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH., & Magan, N. (2011). Reverse transcriptase-coupled quantitative real time PCR analysis of cell-free transcription on the chromatin-assembled p21 promoter. PLoS ONE. 6(8)
[Journal article]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH., Smith, RJ., Shieh, SY., & Roeder, RG. (2011). The GAS41-PP2Cβ complex dephosphorylates p53 at serine 366 and regulates its stability. Journal of Biological Chemistry. 286(13), 10911-10917
[Journal article]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH., Sun, XJ., & Roeder, RG. (2010). The SANT domain of p400 ATPase represses acetyltransferase activity and coactivator function of TIP60 in basal p21 gene expression. Molecular and Cellular Biology. 30(11), 2750-2761
[Journal article]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH., & Roeder, RG. (2006). GAS41 is required for repression of the p53 tumor suppressor pathway during normal cellular proliferation. Molecular and Cellular Biology. 26(11), 4006-4016
[Journal article]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, J., & Roeder, R. (2005). Loss of GAS41 function activates the p53 tumor suppressor pathway through a derepression mechanism. GERONTOLOGIST. 45, 51-52
[Journal article]Authored by: Park, J.

Conference

Park, JH., & Rebecca, S. (2017). Implication of p400 ATPase and ATM interaction for an efficient DNA damage response. Poster session presented at the meeting of 38th annual Lorne genome conference 2017, Mantra Lorne, Australia
[Conference Poster]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH. (2014). p400 Chromatin remodeller and PPM1B protein phosphatase in cellular aging. Poster session presented at the meeting of The 26th International Conference of the Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology, COEX, Seoul, Korea
[Conference Poster]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH. (2013, August). “p400 Chromatin Remodeller in DNA Damage Response and Cellular Senescence”.. Presented at Queenstown molecular biology satellite meeting, Epigenetics. Queenstown, NZ.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH. (2012). Role of GAS41-associated proteins in the Cellular Senescence. Poster session presented at the meeting of 33rd Lorne Genome conference 2012, Mantra Erskine, Australia
[Conference Poster]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH. (2011). Radioisotope- and Cell-free Transcription assays on the Chromatin-assembled p21 promoter.. Poster session presented at the meeting of Queenstown Molecular Biology Meeting 2011-Epigenetics Satellite. Queenstown, New Zealand
[Conference Poster]Authored by: Park, J.
Smith, RJ., & Park, JH. (2011). Activation of the DNA damage response by a chromatin modifier. Poster session presented at the meeting of 32nd Annual Lorne Genome Conference. Lorne, Victoria, Austalia
[Conference Poster]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH., Smith, RJ., Shieh, S., & Roeder, RG. (2011). The GAS41-PP2Cβ complex regulates DNA damage-induced p53 stabilization by p53 dephosphorylations.. Poster session presented at the meeting of 32nd Annual Lorne Genome Conference. Lorne, Victoria, Austalia
[Conference Poster]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH. (2006). GAS41 is required for repression of the p53 tumor suppressor during normal cellular proliferation.. Poster session presented at the meeting of 13th International p53 Workshop. Columbia University, New York, USA
[Conference Poster]Authored by: Park, J.

Other

Park, JH. (2016, March). Activation and targeting mechanism of epigenetic enzymes to the chromatin substrates. In Postgraduate students and academics. Presented at room 304, Jigok Research Bldg, POSTECH, Korea.
[Oral Presentation]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH. (2016, February). Recruitment mechanism of chromatin remodeller/modifier to the target chromatin substrates. In Postgraduate students and academic faculties. Presented at room 2203, Dept. of Biological Science, KAIST, Korea.
[Oral Presentation]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH. (2015, August). New therapeutic targets for cancer and neurodegeneration. In Massey University students and academics. Presented at 2015 PNMRF Colloquium.
[Oral Presentation]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH. (2014, December). Epigenetic enzymes as the therapeutic targets for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In NZ-Korea Health Forum at Massey University.
[Oral Presentation]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH. (2014, November). The bright side of ageing: Roles of MSK1 and PPM1B in cellular senescence. In Korea Polytechnic University, Kyung-gi-do, Korea.
[Oral Presentation]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH. (2014, October). Molecular mechanisms of MSK1 activation. In Korea University, Seoul, Korea.
[Oral Presentation]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH. (2013, August). The Bright side of Aging: Cellular senescence as a tumour suppression mechanism. In PNMRF colloquim at AgHort Lecture Block, Massey University.
[Oral Presentation]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH. (2013, May). The bright side of aging: cellular senescence as a tumour suppression mechanism. In Massey University, IFS.
[Oral Presentation]Authored by: Park, J.
Park, JH. (2012, March). Searching for the fountain of youth.
[Oral Presentation]Authored by: Park, J.

Supervision and Teaching

Summary of Doctoral Supervision

Position Current Completed
Supervisor 0 1

Completed Doctoral Supervision

Supervisor of:

  • 2015 - Rebecca Smith - Doctor of Philosophy
    ATM and p400: Characterisation of a novel interaction between a DNA repair enzyme and a chromatin remodeler

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