Seminars

We are currently holding seminars in these fields of research:

School of Engineering and Advanced Technology Seminars (2017)

Thurs 17 August 2017 (11:30am)

PhD CONFIRMATION SEMINAR

Venue(s):

RC2.143
Video linked to Albany, AL22.09
Title

Characterisation of Damage on Corrugated Fibreboard

Speaker

Aiman Jamsari - PhD Candidate (SP Cluster)

Abstract

Supervisor/s: John Bronlund, Eli Gray-Stuart, Karl Dahm, Celia Kueh
Convenor: Benoit Guieysse
Panel: Saad Hussain (SCION), Gonzalo Martinez

Corrugated Fibreboard (CFB) box is a well-known box that is regularly used for shipping and storage of good products. They are desirable due to their high strength and lightweight while maintaining a low cost. This advantage is primarily aided by the flute geometry that is sandwiched between liners. As different products require different design of the box, research on corrugated fibreboard has been on going from time to time. As corrugated fibreboard helps to protect its content, it is essential to ensure that the box is strong enough to shelter them. This project aims to study the damages that occur on the corrugated fibreboard as they can potentially degrade the strength of corrugated fibreboard significantly. It is proposed to first understand damages through intentional damage such as creases and perforations. In addition, this project will also find out a way to segregate boxes that have been severely damaged from the rest. At the same time, a micro-mechanical model that can predict the behaviour of the damaged board will be developed to reduce the experimental time for other type of board. With the success of this project, the failure rate of the manufactured box can be decreased which will improve the production rate and return cost. Plus, a micromechanical model can also predict the behaviour of any type of damaged corrugated fibreboard accurately which will reduce the experimental time and benefit the design of new boxes.

Thursday 10 August 2017 (1pm)

PhD CONFIRMATION SEMINAR

Venue(s):

RC2.143
(Video linked to Albany: AL22.09 )
Title

Mathematical Model of Bolus Formation Oral Processing

Speaker

Muhammad How -PhD Candidate (SP Cluster)

Abstract

Supervisor/s: John Bronlund, Jim Jones, Eli Gray-Stuart, Marco Morgenstern
Convenor: Benoit Guieysse
Panel: Lovedeep Kaur, Clive Davies

Oral processing is an essential part of our daily life. Understanding oral processing is important as it is the starting point of food disintegration and the digestion process. In this project, to visualise how food is broken in the mouth, food structure is mechanistically linked with the properties of a bolus. A successful outcome of this mechanistic approach (i.e. a mathematical model) will allow food and chemical engineers to design foods that can tailor to many health issues such as dysphagia, xerostomia and diabetes. The construction of an oral processing mathematical model involves the following steps; 1) The development of a conceptual model to visualise the key rate processes involved during oral processing such as particle size breakdown and particles granulation with saliva, 2) The development of the conceptual model into a working mathematical model, 3) The validation of the mathematical model with experimental data from human subjects. A conceptual model of the key rate processes involved when food particles are transformed into a bolus has been drawn and is described in the work done to date section of the report. The bolus properties to be predicted from the model are the particle size distribution, the continuous phase viscosity of the bolus, cohesion force, particle saturation and the concentration of dissolved solutes in the bolus, which are known to have an impact on swallowing and digestion. At this stage, a working model of the particle size distribution utilising the selection and breakage function model has been developed in MathWorks® MATLAB.

Wednesday, 26 July 2017 (12.30pm to 1.30pm)

CONSTRUCTION SEMINAR

Venue(s):

VC room, Building 106, Ōtehā Rohe Precinct
Video link to AH2.83 (Turitea Campus)
Title

Healthy School project

Speaker

Ms Yu Wang (SEAT Construction PhD Student)

Abstract

Nearly all New Zealand (NZ) classrooms depend entirely on natural ventilation via open windows and are grossly under ventilated during winter months. Conventional mechanical ventilation systems are capital and energy expensive; consequently, they are seldom used in NZ schools. However, the school day is closely aligned to the availability of solar radiation. A 3 m2 solar collector that use solar energy to preheat outdoor air was installed on 10 and 12 classroom roofs in winter 2013 and winter 2014 respectively. These units were activated (treatment) or not activated (control) as scheduled. The classrooms were monitored during the school days (occupied period) and during nights, weekends and school holidays (unoccupied period). Results showed that from 9am to 3pm (school hours) the incoming air reached temperatures up to 62.6 ºC. The flow rate of incoming air peaked at 163 m3/h at 21.1 ºC. It took 1.2 hours to change the whole volume of the classroom assuming an approximate volume of 200 m3 per classroom. On average, the temperature of the incoming air was above 18 ºC for 80 % of time. During unoccupied period, the treatment classrooms were warmer than the control classrooms [from +0.12 ºC to +1.29 ºC]. The solar collector played a positive role on the classroom environment by increasing the indoor temperature and ventilation rate during winter. Yu registered the 3 minutes doctoral thesis competition. In this seminar, she will present her research in 3 minutes.

End Session
Title

Prof Robyn Phipps

Speaker

School Monito Box (SKOMOBO)

Abstract

Massey University is currently developing a low cost monitoring suite that is named SKOMOBO (SKOol MOnito BOx). SKOMOBO (Figure 1) was designed to house low cost sensors. These sensors will monitor the classroom temperature, relative humidity, particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) and carbon dioxide level.


Figure1: SKOMOBO, a low cost monitoring suite.

Carbon dioxide level can be used as a proxy to estimate the stuffiness of the classroom. This will show the ventilation level in the classroom and if there is sufficient fresh air for the students. In addition, up to eight infra-red sensors located on classroom windows will monitor how often the windows are open to bring fresh air into the classroom. Understanding ventilation practices in NZ classrooms in a key element.

In addition, Massey University will also deploy three sound level sensors that will measure the noise levels at three different points around the classroom (teacher’s area, back of the classroom and near a window to capture the outdoor noise pollution). This will provide Massey University with information on speech quality: how much of the teacher’s speech could the students sitting at the back of the classroom receive and how much could students be disturbed by noise coming from outside the classroom. This sound information is very important to consider as it has a huge impact on students’ performance.

This full set of low cost sensors located in the SKOMOBO will be an essential tool for documenting our classroom environment. In August 2017, 115 SKOMOBOs will be deployed in 90 classrooms (30 schools), across seven regions, to monitor classroom climate when exposed to winter season (when most of the windows are kept closed). Around half of these schools will be immersion Māori schools (Te Kura Kaupapa Māori).

End Session

Friday 21 July 2017 (10.30am)

PhD CONFIRMATION SEMINAR

Venue(s):

Albany: AL106.15
Video linked to Manawatu: RC1.131
Title

A Risk-Managed Two-Stage Early-Contractor Involvement Procurement Model for the New Zealand Construction Industry

Speaker

David Finnie - PhD Candidate, BE Cluster

Abstract

Supervisor/s: Kenny Park, Naseem Ameer Ali
Convenor: Khalid Arif
Panel:Greg Chawynski, Robyn Phipps

Construction procurement may be defined as the process of acquiring people and other resources necessary to realize a construction project. Depending on the type of client and the nature of a project, a range of procurement methods may be used. These include; (i) employing a design team to fully develop a design and then employing a contractor to build (traditional contracting), (ii) employing a single entity, a contractor, to both design and build, (iii) employing a contractor alongside a design team to provide input during the design phase and then to build (management contracting MC or two-stage early-contractor involvement (2S-ECI); or (iv) employing various trade contractors directly and a consultant to manage them (construction management CM).

Early contractor involvement (ECI) describes procurement methods that involve contractors during the design phase. The subsequent construction phase may then be managed by a head contractor e.g., MC or a consultant e.g., CM. All these relationships must invariably be documented in the form of contracts. Despite well recognized advantages of standard forms of contacts, there are at present no standard model contracts for ECI in New Zealand. Literature review shows where ECI is adopted, the contracts are drafted as bespoke or oneoff contracts.

A literature review of legal doctrines and case law was also done to review the effect on clients’ risk exposure under various procurement methods and contractual arrangements. The risk expose to a client was found to be higher when employing a consultant to manage trade packages employed directly by the client e.g., CM compared to employing a head contractor eg MC or traditional contracting.

In doing the contractual risk review, a flowchart for determining contractors’ claims entitlements beyond a lump sum price contract was developed. The client’s recourse for project breaches under a lump sum construction contract with a contractor was compared against the alternative option with a consultant managed pathway. Using industry observation, document analysis of standard and bespoke contract documents, and review of past literature, a proof-of-concept conceptual model was then developed for a two-stage early-contractor involvement (2S-ECI). The model was designed with a head contractor in place. During the first stage, a contract for pre-construction services was used while at the second stage, a standard form of construction contract was used. A hypothesis was then mooted that a 2S-ECI can reduce the risk to a client and provide transparent pricing without affecting quality. This was tested using two preliminary case studies. The model was subsequently further refined following feedback at a conference presentation and subsequent presentation to an expert panel.

Friday 21 July 2017 (1pm)

PhD CONFIRMATION SEMINAR

Venue(s):

RC2.147
Video linked to Albany: MS3.32 East Precinct Campus
Title

Detecting Java Serialisation Vulnerabilities

Speaker

Shawn Rasheed - PhD Candidate, CSIT Cluster

Abstract

Supervisor/s: Jens Dietrich, Amjed Tahir
Convenor: Catherine McCartin
Panel: Julian Jang-Jaccard (IMS), Giovanni Moretti (SEAT)

An important task in software security is to identify potential vulnerabilities. In recent years there has been a rise in reported Java vulnerabilities. One type of vulnerability involves exploiting serialisation, a commonly used feature in Java applications. Despite attention to coding guidelines and defensive strategies, serialisation remains a risky feature and a cause for weaknesses in object-oriented applications. The problem is, given a software package and its dependencies, to detect this specific class of vulnerabilities, identify the types of security risks associated with them and suggest strategies to prevent attacks that exploit them. The proposed research casts detecting serialisation related vulnerabilities as a program analysis task. The goal is to automatically discover and identify these vulnerabilities using program analysis techniques and to experimentally evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed methods on real-world software.

Fri 7 July 2017 (1.30pm)

PhD CONFIRMATION SEMINAR

Venue(s):

AV2.14 (Video linked to Manawatu, RC2.147 )
Title

Thermomechanical Modelling of 3D Printed Porous Structures for Large Scale Printing

Speaker

Kevin Silver (PhD Candidate)

Abstract

Supervisor/s: Johan Potgieter, Richard Archer, Khalid Arif, Mark Taylor
Convenor: Robyn Phipps
Panel: Liqiong Tang, Xiaowen Yuan

Additive manufacturing (AM) allows designers to build 3D parts of almost any geometry and streamline the process of moving from initial design to prototype in a protracted timeframe. However the existing processes/technologies are limited to small size parts due only to high resolution of the generally produced designs. If a very large part with typical layer resolutions of 0.025mm to approximately 0.2mm is produced, the time required for making such a part will be prohibitive. In addition, the material costs (ranging from tens to thousands of dollars per kilogram) will excessive and the machine size will need to be gigantic. An example of a large scale AM is the printing of milk storage vat insulation and support structure.

As per dairy industry regulations, milk must be stored at a low temperature in a vat after collection from cows. Currently the milk vats are thick walled stainless steel tanks, which are expensive to purchase and require a great deal of insulation and constant cooling to keep the milk at the required temperature. The requirements for thermal insulation and mechanical strength are not easily achievable for passive cooling through conventional manufacturing technologies. Therefore AM offers a great opportunity to achieve mechanical and thermal properties as and where needed.

Unfortunately, AM cannot be directly applied unless mechanical and thermal properties are well understood through experimentation or simulation. The sheer size of the large prints makes it very challenging to test in physical forms and thus leaves simulation the only viable way to ascertain the potential of AM for large applications. However numerical models of 3D printing (3DP) from powder materials (e.g. nylon, stainless steel) are not available, particularly due to the porous nature of the process.

This research is aimed at creating or modifying an existing numerical model to study thermomechanical properties of printed structures. In this regard, inspiration is gleaned from rocks and their models prepared by geologists. Rocks are formed by a similar process to 3DP in nature over long periods and are considered porous, similar to 3DP.

In the first year (as a pretext to the above) milk vat insulation using an appropriate large scale AM technology was studied. The main focus was on optimisation of the structure of the vat insulation and support, and selection/preparation of a lightweight low-cost material. The structures considered were based on the structural and thermal requirements. Among many possibilities, fractal tree-like structure presented an encouraging option for its thermal resistance. This structure showed minimal to no heat loss at thicknesses of around 100mm. However it failed under the loads produced by the buckling of a stainless steel tank. An alternative structure being studied is the honeycomb structure for its strength, which is strong enough to overcome the buckling of the tank. The thermal resistance of the honeycomb however is poor. By combining the benefits of various structures together into a multi-material single structure, the inner section of the structure with thermal resistance and the outer section for mechanical strength can be optimised. A poster on this research was recently presented at MaD while a journal paper on the effects of a heated environment on the properties of an AM part is presently being prepared.

An ideal structure requiring minimum material and printable from existing materials is presently not feasible. However, this research is continuously exploring the possibilities through simulations and experimental testing. The optimum solution for the current problem will be created through a model of the unit block adapted from geological study. This porous thermomechanical model will utilise the similarities of rocks and 3D printed parts to create the model. It is expected that an optimum solution for the current problem will be produced which will be universally applicable to other large-scale printing solutions.

Thursday 29 June 2017 (1pm)

PhD CONFIRMATION SEMINAR

Venue(s):

AV2.14 (Video linked to Manawatu RC2.147 )
Title

Novel Bioprinting Technologies for the Production of Complex Collagen Tissues

Speaker

Juan Schutte (PhD Candidate)

Abstract

Supervisor/s: Johan Potgieter, Steven Dirven, Xiaowen Yuan, Katie Sizeland
Convenor: Khalid Arif
Panel: Frazer Noble, Liqiong Tang

This report examines an opportunity for 3D printing of structured collagen fibres. First, it visits existing literature to develop an understanding of the current capabilities of bio-printing-based tissue engineering, from this the dependency on pressure and heat for high resolution as well as the lack of fibre fabrication methodologies is highlighted as limitations for complex collagen tissue production.

Collagen was reviewed and the cornea is discussed as a structural benchmark for the project. The corneal stroma is identified as the fundamental structural component from which the desirable manufacturing characteristics are derived namely; collagen expressed as nanofiber, this fibre occurring in a highly ordered/aligned manner in overlapping sheets(lamellae) of varying orientations.

Nanofiber production technology was assessed which emphasised electrospinning as preferable given its ability to generate nanofibers of this protein and the capability to adjust fibre and alignment properties with relative ease. The major limitations currently facing this technique involve limited productivity and the toxic nature of solvents. The lack in functionality, the inability to easily manipulate resultant electrospun collagen is highlighted and potential mechanisms for the rectification of this, the application of functionalisation agents, discussed.

A parallel is drawn between the controlled application of functionalisation agents to that of additive manufacturing and coating techniques. Mention is made of the current developments, which combine these technologies and the limitation of these being the lack of retention in nano-scale resolution highlighted. The alternative use of a vapour based functionalising procedure is reviewed and the lack in control of these procedures is discussed with a potential solution of the combining of previously discussed 3D printing mechanisms implied.

Over the last year current literature has been reviewed, a hypothesis derived, fundamental testing conducted and a model for future work and research developed. The hypothesis relates to a process employing an advanced parallel electrode electrospinning technique utilising an actuated collecting surface and layered functionalisation approach to yield a complex collagen tissue. The fundamental testing highlighted a possible inability for a cavity or extrusion based collecting surface approach through the application of electrospinning fibre onto deformed surfaces. From this information the hypothesis was refined and a Computer Aided Design (CAD) model generated in Solidworks along with a costing generated for this.

The project will now progress to act upon these developments by constructing designed mechanisms to facilitate the testing of the hypothesis. Samples from these mechanisms will be analysed (structural, mechanical and optical analysis), resulting in an optimisation phase. Optimised mechanisms and the resultant samples will be subjected to thorough engineering and medical analysis yielding the potential for multiple publications.

Wednesday, 28 June 2017 (12.30pm to 1.30pm)

CONSTRUCTION SEMINAR

Venue(s):

VC room, Building 106, Ōtehā Rohe Precinct
Video link to AH2.83 (Turitea Campus)
Title

Architecture, productivity and occupants’ comfort – facts and fables?

Speaker

Dr Eziaku Rasheed

Abstract

This is a presentation on my research journey through the design intricacies of work environments. It involves the critical exploration of complexities in Green office designs with a focus on occupants’ comfort and productivity, perception studies and environmental control systems.

Wednesday, 3 May 2017 (12.30pm to 1.30pm)

CONSTRUCTION SEMINAR

Venue(s):

VC room, Building 106, Ōtehā Rohe Precinct
Video link to AH2.83 (Turitea Campus)
Title

Wheelchairs, robots, satellites and green buildings

Speaker

Dr. Claire Flemmer

Abstract

This seminar gives a brief overview of 4 research projects that have involved the collaborative efforts of Claire Flemmer, Rory Flemmer and Huub Bakker. Firstly, it presents a novel wheel design that makes the standard manual wheelchair more efficient and less straining for the user. Secondly, it looks at robots for home use and for sports testing. Thirdly, it shows how satellite images of kiwifruit orchards can be used to assess the harvested fruit quality, even when the fruit is very immature. Finally, the results of a post-occupancy evaluation (POE) of a five green star certified primary school are presented.

Bio

Claire has a PhD in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from West Virginia University and 20 years of industrial experience running a robotics and automation business in America. She joined Massey 12 years ago and in that time has taught courses in Engineering, Agriculture and the Built Environment so her research covers these three areas.

End Session
Title

An investigation into the role of commercialization in the conservation of heritage buildings in Malaysia

Speaker

Alian Chan

Abstract

There are many heritage buildings in Malaysia that are worth conserving, but the process of conservation is both complex and costly. If the salvaged building can be used commercially then this may make conservation of heritage buildings more attractive. However, it is important that the essential heritage character is not lost when the building is turned into a commercial entity.

In this work, seven case studies of heritage buildings in Malaysia are examined in order to evaluate whether commercialization is compatible with conservation values. The data creates a framework for determining ways to preserve and conserve heritage building values during commercialization. This can be used by stakeholders (heritage building professionals, local authorities and community groups) to promote an increase in the conservation of Malaysia’s heritage buildings through commercialization.

Bio

Alian Chan is studying for a Master’s degree in Construction, majoring in Quantity Surveying. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Architectural Technology from UCSI University, Malaysia. He has 2 years of experience working in the Construction Industry in Malaysia as an architectural design consultant. He is currently working as an assistant architect with an Auckland-based architectural firm.

During his time working on the conservation of heritage sites in Malaysia he noticed a conflict on what to do with old buildings. On the one hand, the heritage council wanted the buildings restored purely for their heritage value – so many old buildings were simply abandoned. On the other hand, architects could restore heritage buildings for new commercial use.

Alian’s Master’s project will research the question of whether commercialization is a good solution to conserve and revitalize heritage buildings.

End Session

Wednesday, 29 March 2017 (12.30pm to 1.30pm)

Construction Seminars

Venue(s):

VC room, Building 106, Ōtehā Rohe Precinct
Video link to AH2.83 (Turitea Campus)
Title

Whole Life Sustainability and Housing Refurbishment

Speaker

Dr Kenny Park

Abstract

The 2010 BRANZ House Condition Survey found that more than half of the 1.6 million existing homes (of which 1.04 million homes were built without insulation) were in poor or serious condition and the average cost of repairs and maintenance was over $9,000. Besides this, the housing sector in New Zealand (NZ) is faced with additional problems and challenges: increasing house prices, a huge housing-demand, compact jobsites, environmental degradation, import of materials, prolonged supply chains, lack of real-time information integration and labour shortages. New technologies are essential to examine the existing conditions of NZ’s housing and find a way to upgrade and modernise the NZ’s housing stock. One such technology is the proposed Housing Information Modelling (HIM), which models the flow of information for housing construction based on Building Information Modelling and seeks a way to integrate offsite technologies to improve the performance in the existing housing.

Bio

Kenny is a Chartered Construction Manager. He joined the academic staff at Massey University in 2015. He has over 22 years’ experience in both construction industry and academia.

End Session
Title

Post-earthquake time and cost estimation model for commercial buildings

Speaker

Ravindu Kahandawa

Abstract

Due to the continuous earthquakes happening in New Zealand and around the world, more and more buildings are damaged. To make the decision on repair or demolition of a building by the owners, insurance providers and others, the economic viability of repairing is required. The cost models have been produced for this extend but most of them are probabilistic models yet not actual cost of damage repairs cost. This research tends to produce a quantitative model of post-earthquake building repair cost estimation model. Time estimation can be there after produced using bromilow’s cost-time model or work breakdowns.

Bio

Ravindu is a 1st yr PhD student under the supervision of Dr Domingo (Massey University), Dr Park (Massey University), and Dr Uma (GNS Science). Ravindu has 18 months of experience as a quantity surveyor in Sri Lanka.

End Session

Tuesday 5th April, 2016 (3.30 pm)

Inaugural Professorial Address

Venue(s):

Social Studies Lecture Block (SSLB) Room 4
Title

Nurturing Capability and Nursing Vipers: reflections on 100-odd years of quality science

Speaker

Nigel Grigg

Abstract

We live in a world of high quality, reliable products and services, where quality has become more recognisable by its absence than by its presence. This does not happen by accident, as many organisations are still learning. Quality must be designed into a product or service, managed throughout the production and delivery system, and system performance tracked to enable on-going improvement. These are the domains of quality as theory and practice - its very ubiquitousness is the reason that almost all organisations in developed economies are managing quality, even if they might not always realise it.

Over the past 100-odd years, developments in quality science, coupled with a developing political/economic agenda emphasising deregulation, free trade and government non-intervention, have enabled some organisations to grow massively in scale and influence. With growing concerns about corporate ethics and environmental responsibility, the primary concern of quality science is arguably shifting from ‘doing things right’, to ‘doing right things’. In this talk I will reflect on nearly 30 years of involvement in quality, explore its key conceptualisations, and attempt to extrapolate possible directions for quality science in an age of complexity and globalisation. The presentation is mostly pictorial, with minimal text and no formulae.

Friday, 4 December 2015 (10.00am )

Seminar

Venue(s):

Presentation Lab (RC C2.143)
Video Conference link to AL106
Title

Seminar

Speaker

Dr Miao Qiao

Abstract

Dr Qiao’s seminar will consist of two parts. The first part will be on Dr Qiao’s research contributions and the second part will outline the learning and assessment design for a section of an undergraduate course using a specific computer science or information technology concept as an example.

Tuesday, 1 December 2015 (11.00am - 12.00pm)

Research Seminar

Venue(s):

Albany Village Conference Room
Video Conference link to PN in Room RCC2.147
Title

Learning Theorem Proving over Large Formal Libraries

Speaker

Dr Josef Urban

Abstract

The talk will discuss several AI methods used to learn proving of conjectures over large formal mathematical corpora. This includes (i)machine-learning methods that learn from previous proofs how to suggest the most relevant lemmas for proving the next conjectures, (ii) methods that guide low-level proof-search algorithms based on previous proof traces, and (iii) methods that automatically invent suitable theorem-proving strategies on classes of problems. We will show examples of AI systems implementing positive feedback loops between induction and deduction, show the performance of the current methods over the Flyspeck, Isabelle, and Mizar libraries, and also mention emerging AI systems that combine statistical parsing of informal mathematics with such strong theorem proving methods.

Bio

Josef Urban is a researcher at the Czech Institute of Informatics, Robotics and Cybernetics (CIIRC) heading the ERC-funded project AI4REASON. His main interest is development of combined inductive and deductive AI methods over large formal (fully semantically specified) knowledge bases, such as large corpora of formally stated mathematical definitions, theorems and proofs. He received his PhD in Computers Science from the Charles University in Prague in 2004, and MSc in Mathematics at the same university in 1998. He worked as an assistant professor in Prague, and as a researcher at the University of Miami and Radboud University Nijmegen.

Wednesday, 30 September 2015 (9.00am – 10.00am)

Research Seminar

Venue(s):

Presentation Lab (RC C2.143)
Video Conference link to Albany Village
Title

Video Conference link to Albany Village

Speaker

Dr Ebubekir Avci

Abstract

Recent advances in micromanipulation have helped researchers in the bio/medical fields to make many improvements such as uncovering biological processes in small-scale, diagnosing diseases and regenerating tissues. In this talk, design, manufacturing and control of different micro-robotic mechanisms are presented. First, design and control of a piezo actuated micro-parallel mechanism for cell manipulation is explained. Second, manufacturing and control of micro-mechanisms using laser light is presented. Finally, application of micro/nano robotics to various bio/medical applications is described.

Bio

Ebubekir Avci received his BSc degree in mechatronics engineering from Sabanci University, Istanbul, Turkey in 2008, MSc and PhD degrees in robotics from Osaka University, Osaka, Japan, in 2010 and 2013, respectively. Between 2013 and 2014, he was a postdoctoral researcher at Toyota Technological Institute, Nagoya, Japan. He is currently a research associate with the Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery, Imperial College London, London, UK. His current research interests include microrobotics, micromanipulation methods, and parallel mechanisms.

Friday, 28 August 2015 (1.00pm - 2.00pm)

Senior Lecturer to Associate Professor in Information Technology candidate

Venue(s):

Albany Village
Video Conference link to RC C2.147
Title

My vision and actions for the next 5 years at Massey

Speaker

Dr Raymond Choo

Abstract

During this seminar, Dr Choo will outline his 5 year research plan, including a strategy for building team capacity and engaging with industry. Dr Choo will also talk about what is the research he would like to do, that is right for Massey, and of pressing need to industry. For the Albany attendees, an afternoon tea will be available at 2pm to meet and talk with Raymond.

Thursday, 27 August 2015 (1.00pm - 2.00pm)

Senior Lecturer to Associate Professor in Information Technology candidate

Venue(s):

Albany Village
Video Conference link to RC C2.147
Title

My vision and actions for the next 5 years at Massey

Speaker

Dr Ebrima Ceesay

Abstract

During this seminar, Dr Ceesay will outline his 5 year research plan, including a strategy for building team capacity and engaging with industry. Dr Ceesay will also talk about what is the research he would like to do, that is right for Massey, and of pressing need to industry. For the Albany attendees, an afternoon tea will be available at 2pm to meet and talk with Ebrima.

Thursday, 24 August 2015 (9.00am - 10.00am Monday)

Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Mechatronics and Robotics candidate

Venue(s):

This will be a video linked seminar using Adobe Connect. If you wish to attend, please email me and I will send you the URL link to join the seminar
Title

My research and teaching goals at Massey University

Speaker

Dr Ebubekir Avci

Abstract

Monday 17 August 2015 (4.50 pm for a 5.00 pm start)

Venue(s):

Room OR 9, Building 102, Massey University, Oteha Rohe Campus, Gate 4, Albany Highway, North Shore, Auckland.
Title

Seminar on the new Registered Master Builders’ Residential Building Contract RBC-1 2015

Speaker

Abstract

A client wanting to develop any construction project would enter into a construction contract with a contractor. Although this can be an oral contract, it should sensibly be done in writing. Construction contracts are typically entered into based on standard terms of contracts – of which there are a few within New Zealand and a great many more beyond New Zealand. Recently the Building Amendment Act 2013 was introduced to mandate certain types of residential construction contracts to be in writing. Being among the forerunner organizations within the construction industry, the Registered Master Builders Association embarked to amend their contract to make it compliant with the Building Amendment Act 2013. The outcome is the Registered Master Builders’ Residential Building Contract RBC-1 2015. We are privileged to have someone who knows the RBC-1 2015 very well to present and share his knowledge about the contract with us – Mr Tim Blake. Here is his brief biography and the topic he will be presenting: His presentation will primarily focus on the main residential building contract (RBC1-2015) used by Registered Master Builders. He will cover how the contract has had to be modified in response to the Building Amendment Act 2013 and the regulations passed under that Act. He will also discuss other building contracts and building guarantees used by Registered Master Builders.

Bio

Mr Tim Blake is the in-house legal counsel for the Registered Master Builders Association of New Zealand. He was admitted as a Barrister and Solicitor in 1991 and completed an LLM from Victoria University Wellington in 1992. Following that, he worked for over 20 years as a litigation lawyer. During this time he was also a law lecturer at the University of Waikato and at the Open Polytechnic.

Thursday, 13 August 2015 (4.00pm - 5.00pm )

Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Mechatronics and Robotics candidate

Venue(s):

Presentation Lab
Video Conference link to Albany Village
Title

My research and teaching goals at Massey University

Speaker

Mr Arno Ferreira

Abstract

Thursday, 13 August 2015 (2.00pm - 3.00pm Thursday)

Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Mechatronics and Robotics candidate

Venue(s):

Presentation Lab
Video Conference link to AL106 (unfortunately Albany Village conf room unavailable)
Title

My research and teaching goals at Massey University

Speaker

Dr Sugumar Dharmalingam

Abstract

Thursday, 6 August 2015 (11.00am - 12.00 noon)

Lecturer to Associate Professor in Construction Management candidate

Venue(s):

AL106 with Video Conference link to Manawatu
Science Tower B 2.09
Title

A vision for education and research for the Construction programmes at Massey University

Speaker

Mrs Wajiha Shahzad

Abstract

For Albany attendees there will be light lunch following the seminar so you have the opportunity to meet and talk with Wajiha.

Thursday, 6 August 2015 (2 pm - 3pm)

Lecturer to Associate Professor in Construction Management candidate

Venue(s):

AL106 with Video Conference link to Manawatu
Manawatu RC C1.131
Title

A vision for education and research for the Construction programmes at Massey University

Speaker

Dr Cindy Cheong

Abstract

For Albany attendees there will be afternoon tea following the seminar so you have the opportunity to meet and talk with Cindy.

Monday, 11 May 2015 (1.00pm - 2.00pm)

Lecturer/ Senior Lecturer in Mechatronics candidate

Venue(s):

Albany Village
Video Conference link to Palmerston North RC C2.147
Title

The impact of my research in NZ - Past, Present and Future

Speaker

Dr Xiaowen Yua

Abstract

afternoon tea/meet and greet for Albany attendees from 3.15pm - 3.45pm

Monday, 11 May 2015 (9.30am - 10.30am)

Lecturer/ Senior Lecturer in Mechatronics candidate

Venue(s):

Albany Village
Video Conference link to Palmerston North RC C2.147
Title

The impact of my research in NZ - Past, Present and Future

Speaker

Dr Xiaowen Yua

Abstract

followed by morning tea/meet and greet for Albany attendees from 10.30am - 11.00am

Thursday, 7 May 2015 (10.00am - 11.00am)

Lecturer/ Senior Lecturer in Mechatronics candidate

Venue(s):

Albany Village
Video Conference link to Palmerston North RC C2.147
Title

The impact of my research in NZ - Past, Present and Future

Speaker

Dr Ali Raza

Abstract

For Albany attendees there will be morning tea following the seminar so you have the opportunity to meet and talk with Ali

Thursday February 19 (11:00am -12:00noon)

Venue(s):

Riddet Complex – Presentation Lab C2.143
Title

Bacterial circuits of nitrous oxide production characterized using metabolic network modelling and metabolomics

Speaker

Dr Octavio Perez-Garcia, PhD Research Fellow, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Auckland

Abstract

Metabolic network modelling and metabolomics are computational and analytical techniques used to characterize the flow of compounds and energy within metabolic pathways of microbes. This presentation will illustrate the application of such techniques to explain how different environmental conditions of biological nitrogen removal (BNR) processes trigger the production and emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) -a greenhouse gas and ozone depletion substance- by nitrifying and denitrifying microbes. The research approach will be exemplified with three analysis investigating the production of N2O in the following BNR systems: 1) nitrifying pure species cultures, 2) nitrifying mixed cultures, and 3) the denitrifying mixed cultures. Note: this presentation is part of SEAT environmental group internal seminar series and will be preceded by a presentation from research intern Emile Alaux on nitrous oxide emission by microalgae 1030, same location. Everyone is welcome to attend both presentations.

Tuesday, 17 February 2015 (5.00pm – 6:00pm)

Lecturer/ Senior Lecturer in Product Design candidate

Venue(s):

Albany village
Video Conference link to Palmerston North RC C2.147
Title

The Importance of Engineering and Creative Considerations in Successful Product Design

Speaker

Mr Andrew Drain

Abstract

Wednesday, 11 February 2015 (1.00pm - 2.00pm )

Lecturer/ Senior Lecturer in Product Design candidate

Venue(s):

Albany village - For Albany attendees there will be afternoon tea following the seminar so you have the opportunity to meet and talk with Martin.
Video Conference link to Palmerston North RC C2.147
Title

The Importance of Engineering and Creative Considerations in Successful Product Design

Speaker

Mr Martin Ahrens

Abstract

Friday 30th January 2015 (10.00am - 11.00am )

Lecturer/ Senior Lecturer in Mechatronics and Robotics candidate

Venue(s):

Albany Village video conference room - For Albany attendees there will be morning tea following the seminar so you have the opportunity to meet and talk with Steven.
Video link to RC C2.147 in Palmerston North
Title

The role of Mechatronics in innovation and the impact on society

Speaker

Mr Steven Dirven

Abstract

Friday 23rd January 2015 (9.30am – 10.30am)

Lecturer/ Senior Lecturer in Product Development and Innovation Management candidate

Venue(s):

Presentation Lab (Riddet Building) For Manawatu attendees there will be morning tea following the seminar in the Presentation Lab so you have the opportunity to meet and talk with Mark.
Video Conference link to Albany Village
Title

Industry experiences in product innovation and their relevance to university teaching

Speaker

Dr Mark Tunnicliffe

Abstract

In this presentation, case studies of product development undertaken at Tru-Test Limited, Auckland, are discussed, as well as the current Lean Product Development approach of the company. It is shown that the skills, tools and methods used in these projects and the current Tru-Test New Product Development philosophy correlate with the skills and proficiencies hoped to be developed using project-based and active learning in the redesigned SEAT BE course. Similarly, practices and processes used in these product developments relate to the content of the proposed papers in Innovation Management and New Product Development. For example, changing styles of project management of product development across projects are discussed, and these are related to Product Development practices and methods that may form content and case studies of these papers.

Massey Contact Centre Mon - Fri 8:30am to 5:00pm 0800 MASSEY (+64 6 350 5701) TXT 5222 contact@massey.ac.nz Web chat Staff Alumni News Māori @ Massey