Massey Seminar

Dr. Jason P. Julian

Forest and grassland disturbances in New Zealand, and their effect on river water quality 

Map                     

Date:  Wednesday 28th of May, 2014

Venue:  AH2

Time:  12 noon

Rivers are the funnels of landscapes, with their water quality reflecting all that has happened within the catchment over both space and time. Because water quality is dictated by interactions among geomorphic processes, vegetation characteristics, weather patterns, and anthropogenic land uses over multiple spatiotemporal scales, it is an excellent variable in which to investigate impacts of climate and land use changes. In this presentation, I present land disturbance maps (500-m spatial resolution) and time-series (8-day temporal resolution) for all the forests and grasslands of New Zealand from 2000 to 2013. Land disturbance data is then compared to climate data (e.g. drought indices) and water quality data (e.g. water clarity) for select catchments to demonstrate how short-term variations in land cover associated with climate and land management affect river water quality, one of New Zealand’s most important natural resources.

Dr. Jason P. Julian

Associate Professor of Water Resources

Texas State University, Department of Geography

Jason.Julian@txstate.edu 

http://www.geo.txstate.edu/people/faculty/julian.html

 

Massey Seminar

Associate Professor Russell Death

Fiddling as our rivers die: balancing science, policy and advocacy in freshwater management

Date:  Wednesday 7th of May, 2014

Venue:  AH2

Time:  12 noon

The ecological health of New Zealand rivers and lakes appears to be declining. There is considerable scientific and political debate about the causes and potential course of action for halting this decline. Much of this debate revolves around the role that a dramatic increase in the intensification of dairy farming plays. Freshwater science, not surprisingly yields a considerable body of evidence that can be used for judging and reacting to these effects. However, the pathways and the rigour of the evidence used by local and national government is confused and confusing. I will give my personal perspective, as a scientist reluctant to advocate, but with the knowledge to provide useful insight. I struggle with sitting on the river banks pondering ecological theory while the stage for testing that theory dies; for if freshwater ecologists do not advocate for rivers who will?

 

 

 

                       

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