Project INCUBATE   egg-idea.gif

Projects in development at present or awaiting researchers

Graduate thesis students, scholars, policy-makers and citizens from all walks of life are invited to scan and contribute to the ongoing list of ideas to decide if the idea is of any use.
Please contact P.R.Incubate@gmail.com with any ideas or suggestions.

Each project idea is coded by a simple traffic light icon.

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  • green - meaning free-to-air
  • orange - underway but seeking advice and input
  • red - subject to confidentiality (for now)

Project name:  Los signifcados de la "Austeridad" y la "Properidad" (the meaning of "Austerity" and "Prosperity")

Summary: es.gif
Dentro, a través y más allá de una Europa diversa y, a la vez, unida, los conceptos de "austeridad" y el objetivo de la "prosperidad" tienen significados diferentes y nos informan de realidades distintas. Este proyecto busca profundizar en la comprensión de esas diferencias con una investigación aplicada socialmente innovador y sensible. ¿Cómo las personas que viven con austeridad, prosperidad o a un nivel intermedio entienden la dirección hacia la que dirigirse?

Summary: gb.gif
Within, across and beyond a diversified and potentially more united Europe, "austerity" and the goal of "prosperity" have different and potentially informative meanings. This project seeks to bridge those gaps with socially innovative and responsive applied research. How do people living with austerity, prosperity and the road in-between understand the direction forwards?

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Participating organisations:
Universidad de Valencia; Massey University; Toulouse Business School

Contact details:
Professors Amparo Caballer (amparo.caballer@uv.es) and Maria Jesus (maria.j.bravo@uv.es)

Project name: Does CSR benefit the community? A systematic review

Summary:
Corporate social responsibility can be done well, in which case it has been demonstrated to benefit the organization. However little or no research has been conducted to systematically evaluate the impact of csr on the community, and especially what works to reduce poverty, improve the environment, foster well-being, etc. This project is a systematic review of the social and community bottom line for CSR.

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Participating organisations:
EvidenceAid/The Cochrane Collaboration, the UN Global Compact, Makerere University, Massey University

Contact details:
s.c.carr@massey.ac.nz
or jgodbout06@yahoo.com

Project name: Just Pay?

Summary:
The UN principle of Alignment states that aid and development should be aligned with local aspirations, which under the ILO principle of Decent Work includes decent wages. The dual salary system, which normally remunerates equivalently skilled and qualified host national workers lower than their expatriate counterparts may contradict this principle in the workplace. Some NGOs are boldly reforming salary systems with the goal of maximizing alignment, often without support to conduct research on what works, and why. This project is a partnership between NGOs and researchers, facilitated by People in Aid, in collaboration with the Poverty Research Group at Massey University in New Zealand/Aotearoa.

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Participating organisations:
People in Aid; Massey University

Contact details:
Jeffrey Godbout ( iohumanist@gmail.com ) for more details about the project.

Project name: The Organisational Gini Coefficient

Summary:
The Gini Coefficient has been widely used to denote the extent of equality/inequality in societies, but less so in organisations where any discrepancies may be more salient. This project will explore the extent to which an organizational gini coefficient is linked to organizational processes and outcomes, as well as stakeholder impacts in the wider community.

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Participating organisations:
Trinity College Dublin, Tshwane University, Massey University.

Contact details:

Stuart Carr s.c.carr@massey.ac.nz

Project name: During economic recession, what job selection practices reduce job selection bias against new skilled immigrants?

Summary:
Economic recession may tend to exacerbate job selection biases against new settlers. At the same time, recovery from recession depends on skilled people finding decent work to fit their talents and motivation. Social inclusion is a platform for prosperity for all. This projects seeks to expand research theory and praxis on how employment bias and prejudice can be most effectively counteracted.

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Participating organisations:
Open

Contact details:
Citation: Anon (2012), contact Poverty Research Group if you are interested in taking over this project

Project name: Refugee Organisation project - Potential Master's Project

Summary:

A Masters level research project is available to an interested and motivated Psychology student. Supervision will be offered by Prof Stuart Carr at the Albany campus of the School of Psychology.

Discussions with an organisation providing services to refugees has lead to the identification of the  need to identify all services in New Zealand involved in providing assistance to migrants and especially refugees. There are many agencies active in providing services to refugees but these often do not know about each other and what they offer. There is thus a lack of knowledge, communication and coordination between these various services, resulting in people falling between the cracks and the inefficient use of resources.

The project would thus focus on the identification of all relevant services, the clarification of the services they provide, the specification of referral routes, and the coordination of communication between these services. Aside from providing real-life organisational research this project will also make a valuable contribution to the provision of services to refugees in New Zealand.

Participating organisations:
Refugee Services

Contact details:
Professor Stuart Carr (s.c.carr@massey.ac.nz) or Dr Clifford van Ommen (C.VanOmmen@massey.ac.nz)

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