Citation instructions and examples

Submission of citation

The purpose of the citation is to give a quick outline of your research to the layperson.  Please provide a brief statement (150 words maximum) indicating:

  1. why your topic is important and/or why you undertook your study
  2. what you did
  3. what you found at the end of it and/or what original contribution you have made to knowledge.

Please note: citations should be written in the third person, in the past tense and jargon should be avoided or explained, if unavoidable (see examples below).  This version of the citation will appear in the graduation programme and/or on the Higher Research Degree website.

Please email your citation to doctoral.office@massey.ac.nz

Abridged version of citation to be read out by the Vice-Chancellor at the graduation ceremony

There are two versions of the citation.  In addition to the above, an abridged version (two to three sentences) will be read out by the Vice-Chancellor at the ceremony (because the 150 word versions are too long for this).  Please note that this is limited to two or three sentences and sentences nee to be as short as possible, so they can be read aloud comfortably.  Please avoid using jargon and if jargon is unavoidable please explain it.

Pronunciation of your name

Please provide the pronunciation of your name to assist the Vice-Chancellor in pronouncing it correctly at the graduation ceremony, see examples below.

Yuliya Bozhiko                              U – LEE – A   BOZ-KO
Fabrice Michel Brescia                   FAB – REECE   ME – SHELL   BRE – SHEE – A
Mohinder Singh                            MO – HIND – A   SING
Sargunamoorthy Sivaraj               SAR – GUNNA – MORE – THEE   SIV – ARE – ARG
Baiduri Widanarko                        BY – DOO – REE   WEE – DAA – NAR – KO

Pronunciation of any technical terms

Please provide the pronunciation of any technical terms to assist the Vice-Chancellor in pronouncing them correctly at the graduation ceremony, examples below.

dipyrrin                          DIE – PRRIN
Diaeretiella rapae            DA – RI – TEE – E – LA   RAA – PI

Examples of citations

Shailer, Jacinda (Doctor of Clinical Psychology, 2015)

"Wraparound New Zealand:  An Evaluation of Fidelity and Experiences"

Serious mental health disorders are complex clinical problems which interfere with a youth's ability to live functionally within their family and community. The wraparound process is an intensive, family driven, and individualised care planning process. It works holistically with young people with serious mental health disorders and their families to coordinate interventions, supports, and services. Originating from the United States of America and deemed a promising practice internationally, no independent research had been conducted on this process within a New Zealand context. Ms Shailer investigated the fidelity to, and the experiences of, one wraparound process in New Zealand with 16 wraparound teams. She found that it was experienced as a positive and helpful process being implemented as intended, with overall fidelity in the above average range. The results confirmed that the wraparound process was a viable and useful intervention for New Zealand youth and families with high and complex needs.

Abridged version of citation to be read out by the Vice-Chancellor at the graduation ceremony:

The wraparound process is a care coordination and planning process that works holistically with young people with serious mental health disorders and their families. Ms Shailer investigated the fidelity to, and the experiences of, one wraparound process in New Zealand. The results confirmed wraparound as a viable and useful intervention that was being implemented as intended and positively experienced.

PRONUNCIATION OF FULL NAME:

JA - CIN - DA SHAY - LER

 

Agustin-Flores, Javier (PhD, Earth Sciences, 2015)

"The role of substrate hydrogeology and surface hydrology in the construction of phreatomagmatic volcanoes on an active monogenetic field (Auckland, New Zealand)"

The city of Auckland is situated on a monogenetic field. A monogenetic field is associated with the eruption of small volcanoes. In the eruptive history of the field, more than 80 percent of erupted volcanoes had an initial phase that included explosive interaction of water with magma (phreatomagmatism). The hazards associated to phreatomagmatic eruptions may be very destructive and hence the importance to reconstruct the eruptive history of Auckland volcanoes to identify their eruptive styles and evaluate their associated hazards. Mr Agustin-Flores studied some of the volcanoes of Auckland and found that the eruptive styles in the course of an eruption, and in turn their associated hazards, strongly depend on the hydrogeological conditions of the rocks beneath the volcanoes and the surface hydrological conditions. Three eruptive scenarios were envisaged and it is possible that these scenarios may be replicated in the future.

Abridged version of citation to be read out by the Vice-Chancellor at the graduation ceremony:

Explosive water-magma interaction is common in the Auckland volcanic field. Mr Agustin-Flores found that phreatomagmatic eruptions in the field strongly depend on the hydrogeological conditions of the rocks beneath the volcanoes and the surface hydrological conditions. Three eruptive scenarios were envisaged and it is possible that these scenarios may be replicated in the future.

PRONUNCIATION OF FULL NAME:

Javier Agustin-Flores

HA-VEE-EHR  AH-GOOS-TEEN  FLO-REHS

PRONUNCIATION OF TECHNICAL TERM:

Phreatomagmatic

FREE-ATO-MAG-MAT-IC

Sizeland, Katherine (PhD Engineering, 2015)

“Nanostructure and Physical Properties of Collagen Biomaterials”

Collagen is the main structural component of leather, skin, pericardium (the sac enclosing the heart), and other tissues. These biomaterials have a mechanical function and their physical properties are partly a result of the structural arrangement of collagen. Ms Sizeland used synchrotron-based small angle X-ray scattering to investigate the architecture of collagen in leather and other biomaterials focusing on how the structure changes when different chemical and mechanical processes are applied. In leather, a structure-strength relationship was quantified across a range of different animals and nanostructural changes to collagen were identified throughout the leather-making process. Structural and physical properties were determined to be age-dependent in pericardium. By understanding the hierarchical structure of collagen and its mechanisms for modification when subjected to different chemical and mechanical processes, Ms Sizeland's research has provided valuable insight in to understanding the performance of leather, skin, and other tissues in biological, medical, and industrial contexts.

Abridged version of citation to be read out by the Vice-Chancellor at the graduation ceremony:

By understanding the hierarchical structure of collagen and its mechanisms for modification when subjected to different chemical and mechanical processes, Ms Sizeland's research has provided a valuable insight in to understanding the performance of leather, skin, and other tissues in biological, medical, and industrial contexts. 

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