Moses Maalo Faleolo

PhD, (Social work)
Study Completed: 2015
College of Health

Citation

Thesis Title
Hard-Hard-Solid! Life histories of Samoans in bloods youth gangs in New Zealand

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Mr Faleolo sought to establish why youth gangs have formed in New Zealand urban centres, and why some young Samoan males are attracted to these gangs.  It used theoretical literature such as Socialization theory and Delinquency theory to explore both how the cultural and societal socialization of young Samoan males lead them to gangs as well as how socialization within gangs secures their commitment to high risk and potentially dangerous behaviour.  Life histories were collected over an eighteen month period from twenty five young Samoan males aged over sixteen years who were members of various Bloods gangs.  Findings from studies of socialization experiences confirmed that various socio-cultural strains weakened controls and led them into gangs, where they are then ''re-socialized'' by their new gang peers. It revealed gang members'' reasons for both joining and leaving gangs and the extent to which Samoan cultural values and practices shape gang values and practices.

Supervisors
A/Pro Kieran O'Donoghue
Prof Cluny Macpherson
A/Pro Michael O'Brien

Publications

Faleolo, M.M. (2013). Horseing it and fried up: Health risks for Samoans in South Auckland Bloods youth gangs. In N. Seve-Williams, M. Taumopeau & E. Saafi (Ed.). Pacific Edge: Transforming knowledge into innovative practice. Research papers from the fourth Health Research Council of New Zealand Pacific Health Research Fono (pp. 49-56). Auckland, New Zealand: Health Research Council of New Zealand. 

Faleolo, M.M. (2012, April). Horseing it and fried up: Health risks for Samoans in South Auckland Bloods youth gangs. Paper presented at the Pacific Edge: Transforming knowledge into innovative. Health Research Council Pacific Health Research Fono, Auckland, New Zealand.

Faleolo, M.M. (2011, December). From the street to the village: The transfer of youth culture in New Zealand to Samoa. Paper presented at the Pacific Islands Political Studies Association 12th Conference, University of South Pacific, Samoa campus.      

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