Culture, communication,
and cognition:
Vygotskian perspectives

Edited by JAMES V. WERTSCH


1985 . CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS . Cambridge
ISBN 0 521 25214 8 hard covers
ISBN 0 521 33830 1 paperback

Contents

Foreword BERNARD WEISSBOURD vii List of contributors ix Introduction JAMES V. WERTSCH 1 Part I. Explicating Vygotsky's approach 1. Vygotsky: a historical and conceptual perspective 21 JEROME BRUNER 2. Vygotsky's theory and the activity-oriented approach in psychology 35 V.V. DAVYDOV and L.A. RADZIKHOVSKII 3. Intellectual origins of Vygotsky's semiotic analysis 66 BENJAMIN LEE 4. Vygotsky's ideas about units for the analysis of mind 94 V.P. ZINCHENKO 5. Vygotsky's uses of history 119 SYLVIA SCRIBNER 6. The zone of proximal development: where culture and cognition create each other 146 MICHAEL COLE 7. The concept of internalization in Vygotsky's account of the genesis of higher mental functions 162 JAMES V. WERTSCH and C. ADDISON STONE Part II. Extending Vygotsky's approach: semiotic issues 8. Language acquisition as increasing linguistic structuring of experience and symbolic behavior control 183 RAGNAR ROMMETVEIT 9. The functional stratification of language and ontogenesis 205 MICHAEL SILVERSTEIN 10. The implications of discourse skills in Vygotsky's developmental theory 236 MAYA E. HICKMANN 11. Language viewed as action 258 DAVID McNEILL Part III. Extending Vygotsky's approach: issues in education, cognitive development, and language development 12. Diagnosing zones of proximal development 273 ANN L. BROWN and ROBERTA A. FERRARA 13. The tacit background of children's judgments 306 KARSTEN HUNDEIDE 14. Exploring Vygotskian perspectives in education: the cognitive value of peer interaction 323 ELLICE A. FORMAN and COURTNEY B. CAZDEN 15. The road to competence in an alien land: a Vygotskian perspective on bilingualism 348 VERA JOHN-STEINER Name index 373 Subject index 378

Contributors

ANN L. BROWN Center for the Study of Reading, Universit,v of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois JEROME BRUNER New School for Social Research, New York, New York COURTNEY B. CAZDEN Graduate School of Education, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts MICHAEL COLE Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition, University of California, La Jolla, California V.V. DAVYDOV Institute of General and Pedagogical Psychology, Academy of Pedagogical Sciences, Moscow, USSR ROBERTA A. FERRARA Center for the Study of Reading, University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois ELLICE A. FORMAN Program on Learning Disabilities, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois MAYA E. HICKMANN Max-Planck Institut fiir Psycholinguistik, Nijmegen, Holland (also Center for Psychosocial Studies, Chicago, Illinois) KARSTEN HUNDEIDE Institute of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway VERA JOHN-STEINER Educational Foundations Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico BENJAMIN LEE Center for Psychosocial Studies, Chicago, Illinois (also Department of Anthropology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois) DAVID McNEILL Committee on Cognition and Communication, University of Chicago, Illinois L.A. RADZIKHOVSKII Institute of General and Pedagogical Psychology, Academy of Pedagogical Sciences, Moscow, USSR RAGNAR ROMMETVEIT Institute of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway SYLVIA SCRIBNER Developmental Psychology Program, City University of New York, New York MICHAEL SILVERSTEIN Department of Anthropology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois C. ADDISON STONE Program on Learning Disabilities, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois JAMES V. WERTSCH Department of Linguistics, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois (also Center for Psychosocial Studies, Chicago, Illinois) V.P. ZINCHENKO Department of Psychology, Moscow State University, Moscow, USSR