BACKGROUND

What follows is a draft 'reading list' for a possible course introducing the theoretical foundations of 'narrative' therapy. Further details and the like will emerge as discussions in the 'background' continue.


INTRODUCTION:

(1) Stories vs Knowledge

Bruner, J.S. (1992) The narrative construction of reality. In H. Beilin and P. B. Pufall (Eds) Piaget's theory: Prospects and possibilities. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Pp: 229-248.

C. Mattingly (1991) The narrative nature of clinical reasoning. American Journal of Occupational Therapy 45: 998-1005

Ochs, E., Taylor, C., Rudolph, D. and Smith, R. (1992) Storytelling as a theory-building activity. Discourse Processes 15: 37-72

Somers, M. R. and Gibson, G. D. (1994) Narrative and the social constitution of identity. In C. Calhouhn (Ed.) Social theory and the politics of identity. Oxford: Blackwell. Pp.37-99.

(2) Social contructionism versus other 'constructivisms'

Brunner, E. M. and Gorfain, P. (1984) Dialogic narration and the paradoxes of Masada. In Text, play and story: The construction and reconstruction of self and society. 1983 Proceedings of the American Ethnological Socirty. Washington, DC: American thnological Society. Pp. 56-79.

Chiari, G. and Nuzzo, M. L. (1996) Psychological constructivisms: A metatheoretical differentiation. Journal of Constructivist Psychology 9: 163-84.

Edwards, D and Potter, J. (1992) World-making and self-making. Chapter 6, Pp. 127-152 in Discursive Psychology. London: Sage.

Hoyt, M. (????) Postmodernism, the relational self, constructive therapies, and beyond: A conversation with Kenneth Gergen. In M. F. Hoyt (Ed.) Constructive Therapies 2. New York: Guilford Press.

(3) Working stories

Burr, V. (1995) What does it mean to be a person? III Subject positions in discourse. Chapter 9, Pp. 140-158 in An introduction to social constructionism. London: Routledge.

Eng, I (1982) Dallas and the melodramatic imagination. Chapter 2, Pp. 51-85 in Watching Dallas: Soap opera and the melodramatic imagination. London: Methuen.

Macdonald, M. (1995) From Mrs Happyman to kissing chaps goodbye: Advertising reconstructs femininity. Chapter 3, Pp. 73-102. In Representing women: Myths of femininity in the popular media. London: Edward Arnold.

Parry, A. (1992) A universe of stories. Family Process 30: 37-53

Tannen, D. (1994) 'She's the boss': women and authority. Chapter 6, Pp. 160-203 in Talking from 9 to 5: How women and men's conversational styles affect who gets heard, who gets credit, and what work gets done. New York: William Morrow.

POWER, NARRATIVE AND THERAPY

(1) Getting political

Cowley, G. and Springen, K (1995) Rewriting life stories. Newsweek, April 17, 70-74.

Freedman, J. and Combs, G. (1996) The narrative metaphor and social constructionism: A postmodern world view. Chapter 2, Pp. 19-41 in Narrative therapy: The social construction of preferred realities.

Gergen, K. (1990) Therapeutic professions and the diffusion of deceit. Journal of Mind and Behavior 11: 353/107-368/122.

Parry, A. and Doan, R. E. (1994) Doing narrative therapy in a destoried world. Chapter 2, Pp. 12-43 in Story re-visions: Narrative therapy in the postmodern world. New York: Guilford.

Polkinghorne, D. E. (1993) Postmodern epistemology of practice. In S Kvale (Ed.) Postmodernism and psychology. London: Sage. Pp. 146-165.

White, M. (1993) Deconstruction and therapy. In S. Gilligan and R. Price (Eds.) Therapeutic Conversations. New York: Norton. Pp. 22-61

(2) Getting theoretical

Burr, V. (1995) What does it mean to have power? Chapter 4, Pp. 62-78 in An introduction to social constructionism. London: Routledge.

Pearce, L. (1994) Bakhtin and the dialogic: I Freudianism: A critical sketch (1927); II The formal method (1928); III Marxism and the philosophy of language. Part of Chapter 1, Pp. 27-43 in Reading dialogics. London: Routledge.

Wertsch, J. V. (1991) I Beyond Vygotsky: Bakhtin's contribution; II The multivoicedness of meaning. Being Chapters 2 and 3, Pp. 46-92 in Voices of the mind: a sociocultural approach to mediated action.

White, M. and Epston, D. (1990) Story, knowledge, and power. Chapter 1, Pp. 1-37 in Narrative means to therapeutic ends. New York: Norton.

(3) Getting therapeutic

Amundson, J., Stewart, K. and Valentine, L. (1993) Temptations of power and certainty. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy 19: 111-123

Anderson, H. and Goolishian, H. A. (1988) Human systems as linguistic systems. Family Process 27: 371-93.

Doherty, W. J. (1991) Family therapy goes postmodern. Family Therapy Networker 15(5): 36-42.

White, M. (1995) The narrative perspective in therapy. The Family Journal 2: 71-83. Also Chapter 1 of Re-authoring lives: Interviews and essays. Adelaide: Dulwich Centre.

White, M. and Epston, D. (1990) Externalising of the problem. Chapter 2, Pp. 38-76 in Narrative means to therapeutic ends. New York: Norton.

NARRATIVE THERAPY

(1) Background

White, M (1984) Pseudo-encopresis: from avalanche to victory, from vicious to virtuous cycles. Family Systems Medicine 2: 150-60 (Reprinted in Selected papers (1989)).

White, M. (1986) Negative explanation, restraint and double description: A template for family therapy. Family Process 25: 169-84 (Reprinted in Selected papers (1989)).

Wylie, M. S. (1994) Panning for gold. Family Therapy Networker, Nov/Dec: 40-9.

(2) Dominant Stories, Unique Outcomes and Therapeutic Letters.

Epston, D. (1993) Internalizing discourses versus externalizing discourses. In S. Gilligan and R. Price (Eds.) Therapeutic Conversations. New York: Norton. Pp. 161-180.

Epston, D. (1994) Extending the conversation. Family Therapy Networker Nov/Dec: 31-9, 62-3.

Redekop, F. (1995) The 'problem' of Michael White and Michel Foucault. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy 21: 309-18.

White, M. (1989) The externalizing of the problem and reauthoring of lives and relationships. Dulwich Centre Newsletter, Summer, 3-21.

White, M. (1995) Therapeutic documents revisited. In Re-authoring lives: Interviews and essays. Adelaide: Dulwich Centre. Pp. 199-221.

White, M. and Epston, D. (1990) A storied therapy. Chapter 3, Pp. 77-187 in Narrative means to therapeutic ends. New York: Norton.

(3) Questioning.

Epston, D. (1986) Night watching: An approach to night fears. Dulwich Centre Review, 28-39. Reprinted in Collected Papers (1989) Pp. 47-59

Epston, D. (1993) Internalized other questioning with couples: A New Zealand version. In S. Gilligan and R. Price (Eds.) Therapeutic Conversations. New York: Norton. Pp. 183-9.

Freedman, J. and Combs, G. (1996) Questions. Chapter 5, Pp. 113-43 in Narrative therapy: The social construction of preferred realities. New York: Norton

Hewson, D. (1991) From laboratory to therapy room: prediction questions for reconstructing the 'new-old' story. Dulwich Centre Newsletter, 3: 5-12.

Roth, S. and Epston, D. (1966) Consulting the problem about the problematic relationship: An exercise for experiencing a relationship with an externalised problem. In M. F. Hoyt (Ed.) Constructive Therapies 2. New York: Guildford. (See also, Journal of Systemic Therapies, 1996

White, M. (1988) The process of questioning: A therapy of literary method. Dulwich Centre Newsletter, Winter, 8-14. (Reprinted in Selected Papers, 1989).

[See also here Epston, D. and Roth, S. (1994) Framework for a White/Epston type interview. Unpublished summarry notes based on but extending the above]

THE 'HARD' STUFF

(1) Beyond Family Therapy

Harper, D. (in press) Discourses of conspiracy, suspicion and mistrust: 'Paranoia' and its cultural significance. Cultural Studies.

Harper, D. (in press) Deconstructing 'paranoia': Towards a discursive understanding of apparently unwarranted suspicion. Theory and Psychology

White, M. (1995) Psychotic experience and discourse. In Re-authoring lives: Interviews and essays. Adelaide: Dulwich Centre. Pp. 112-154.

(2) Mind and Body

Epston, D., Morris, F. and Maisel, R. (1995) A narrative approach to so-called anorexia/bulimia. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy 7: 69-96.

Griffith, J. L., Griffith, M. E. and Slovik, L. S. (1990) Mind-body problems in family therapy: Contrasting first- and second-order cybernetic approaches. Family Process 29: 13-28.

White, M. (1986) Anorexia nervosa: a cybernetic perspective. In J. Elka-Harkary (Ed.) Eating disorders and family therapy. New York: Aspen (Reprinted in Selected Papers, 1989).

Winslade, J. and Smith, L. (1996) Countering alcoholic narratives. Chapter 6, Pp. 158-191, in G. Monk, J. Winslade, K. Crocket and D. Epston (Eds.) Narrative therapy in practice: The archaeology of hope. San Fransisco: Jossey-Bass

(3) Reflecting Teams

Anderson, T. (1992) Reflections on reflecting with families. In S. McNamee and K. Gergen (Eds) Therapy as social construction. London: Sage

Freedman, J. and Combs, G. (1996) Reflections. Chapter 7, Pp. 169-93 in Narrative therapy: The social construction of preferred realities. New York: Norton.

Perlesz, A., Young, J., Paterson, R. and Bridge, S. (1994) The reflecting team as a reflection of second order therapeutic ideals. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy 15: 117-27

(4) Ethics and Experts

Freedman, J. and Combs, G. (1996) Relationships and ethics. Chapter 10, Pp. 264-88 in Narrative therapy: The social construction of preferred realities. New York: Norton.

Winslade, J., Crocket, K. and Monk, G. (1996) The therapeutic relationship. Chapter 3, Pp 53-81, in G. Monk, J. Winslade, K. Crocket and D. Epston (Eds.) Narrative therapy in practice: The archaeology of hope. San Fransisco: Jossey-Bass


Any comments on the above will be gratefully received, and forwarded into the discussion forum from whence the above emerged.


Comments to A.J.Lock@massey.ac.nz
Department of Psychology, Massey University , New Zealand
URL: http://www.massey.ac.nz/~ALock
last changed Monday, 11 August 1997