Signing for a deaf cat

Signing for a deaf cat

CAPTION: Owners of deaf cat in Garfield street in Brooklyn made and nailed the sign up outside their street. Photo: Hope Burmeister.

A sign urging drivers to watch out for a deaf cat on the road is proving to be popular among the Brooklyn neighbourhood.

The Sanson family, who live on Garfield street, put the sign up outside their street to protect their cat from being hit.

Blair Hiscoke who lives on Garfield street said the cat, Pip, was well-known to the neighbours as he is a white cat with a blue and green eye. He said everybody took care of him. “They’ve taken the time and effort to make and put up this sign which shows how much they care about their cat.”

The Sansons also put up a sign in the movie theatre with a photo of the cat, urging drivers who want to park on Garfield street to be wary.

Amie Sanson, 14, holding the family’s deaf cat, Pip. Photo: Supplied.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amie Sanson, 14, had the idea for a sign as she wanted something people would notice. “Hopefully people will notice if it’s a big sign. I mean, people normally notice speed limits or something so hopefully it would catch their attention.”

The family started to worry when they saw Pip sitting behind wheels of the neighbours’ cars and lying in the middle of the road on warm days. “He thinks he owns the road,” Amie Sanson said.

Pip is popular in the community, with neighbours in support of the sign to protect the deaf cat from oncoming cars. Photo: Supplied.

Because Pip is deaf, he could see but couldn’t hear cars coming. Natalie Sanson, 11, said if he wasn’t deaf, he might be afraid of the sound of cars.

“I don’t think he really knows that they’re [cars] kind of dangerous and it’s a thing that he should stay away from.”

John Sanson said that there had been people in cars who had to stop and move the cat off the road. Since putting the sign up, Sanson hoped it would encourage people to drive cautiously when going past or finding a park in Garfield street. “He’s still alive. That’s the measure of success.”

The sign is made out of wood, plastic corflute and the words have been painted on.

Council spokesman Richard Maclean said most community signs put up are garage sale flyers and usually were not up for very long. “In the case of such works of art like the ‘deaf cat’ sign, we’d probably be prepared to turn a blind eye to it,”

“We’ve not had any complaints about it – which probably indicates that it’s popular in the neighbourhood and that the locals are genuinely concerned for the welfare of the cat.”

The flyer put up in the Brooklyn Penthouse Cinema to let cinema-goers know to be careful when parking in Garfield street. Photo: Supplied.

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Article by Hope Burmeister

About Author I am a student reporter covering the Brooklyn/Happy Valley areas along with other stories in the Wellington region. I have a degree in Creative Writing and English so I love it when I get to do a creative story! My passion is writing and reading classic literature, especially Jane Austen.


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Article by Hope Burmeister

About Author I am a student reporter covering the Brooklyn/Happy Valley areas along with other stories in the Wellington region. I have a degree in Creative Writing and English so I love it when I get to do a creative story! My passion is writing and reading classic literature, especially Jane Austen.


View Profile
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