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HWG research students

Student members of the HWG play a critical role contributing to the groups research agenda. Our students not only pursue their own work for their studies, but are involved in larger research and consulting projects within the broader group. Three of our HWG academic staff members were previously PhD student members of the group, and they will attest to the collaborative dynamics we value.

For motivated, passionate and additive students, there are currently opportunities to study with the HWG. We invite proposals or inquiries about undertaking a PhD under our supervision. Please note that all approvals to study must still go through Massey University’s formal PhD enrollment process.

Current PhD Students

Claire Gray

About Claire's Research:

My PhD research intends to explore nurses' experiences of caring for patients who have sexually harassed them, through the use of emotional labour. Specifically, my research aims to explore the relationships between sexual harassment, the emotional labour strategies of surface acting and deep acting, and the wellbeing of nurses. Accordingly, I intend to adopt a mixed methods approach, to examine these relationships; initially, these will be studied quantitatively, before following up with a qualitative approach to delve further into nurses' usage of emotional labour as a means to provide care to sexually harassive patients.

Claire and the HWG:

As an early stage PhD researcher, I am really enthused to be a member of the Healthy Work Group. To be part of a research group that is dedicated to workplace health and safety is a great privilege, and something that I too am passionate about. I enjoyed the writing retreat earlier in the year, and am looking forward to working with members of the Healthy Work Group over the course of my PhD studies.

Nicola Green

About Nicola's Research:

My PhD research is exploring the impact of telehealth videoconferencing services (THVCS) on the work system for key stakeholders in New Zealand.  Video-conferencing instead of in-person consultation is a potential tool to aid healthcare delivery through improved accessibility, lower costs and better allocation of human resources. However, the literature suggests that uptake of telehealth is less than anticipated and there are difficulties with embedding telehealth into routine services.

In addition, the introduction of technology can be disruptive and change the nature of work for all those involved in the service. My study, informed by sociotechnical systems theory, seeks to explore the facilitators and barriers of effective THVCS and how the work system can be designed to enable THVCS to be a sustained healthcare practice in New Zealand. 

Nicola and the HWG:

Being a member of the Healthy Work Group provides a supportive network of knowledgeable, passionate and fun peers.  This is particularly valuable to me as a distance student as it enables me to feel a connection to other students and scholars.  In addition, the HWG provides other opportunities to be involved in academic life, including the recent highly productive and enjoyable three-day writing retreat.

Email: n.j.green@massey.ac.nz

Jishuo Sun

About Jishuo’s Research: 

My PhD research explores the role of management competencies to enhance employee wellbeing. Given that psychosocial risks, such as stress and bullying in the workplace, have negative impacts on employee health, and limit corporate sustainable development, line managers play a crucial role in reducing stress and bullying at work. Unfortunately, these risks are often unresolved due to lack of relevant competencies in line managers. Therefore, the purpose of my research is to identify management competencies required by managers for enhancing employee wellbeing, and then examine the relationship between employees’ perceptions of their managers’ competencies and their personal experiences of a) workplace stress and b) workplace bullying.

Jishuo and the HWG: 

Being a member of the Healthy Work Group is one of the most valuable things in my PhD journey. As a early stage PhD researcher, the Healthy Work Group not only provides an outstanding academic environment related to my research interests, but also a warm and friendly family environment which encourages and guides me. I am honored to be in the Healthy Work Group, and greatly enjoy working with the group members.

Email: J.Sun3@massey.ac.nz

Blake Yue

About Blake's research

My PhD research aims to raise the understanding of work stress resulting from  being HIV-positive in New Zealand. Given that HIV-positive and AIDS are currently incurable and transmittable diseases, individuals infected with HIV may be exposed to various psychosocial risk factors in their workplace. As a minority group with an illness that still carries a strong anti-social stigma there are many who consider the psychosocial risks associated with HIV-positive people in New Zealand have received little research focus, and it seems there is limited literature or evidence-based research. Therefore, the purpose of my research is to explore if being HIV positive creates a differential effect in relation to psychosocial risk in the work place in New Zealand.

Blake and the HWG:

As an academic newcomer, it is an honour for me to be a member of the Healthy Work Group. I have always been passionate about the health and well-being of marginalized people and minorities, and the Healthy Work Group provides me with the opportunity to contribute towards helping them. I am very grateful to the members of the group - all of whom have been very helpful to me and the friendly family like environment and have inspired me greatly in the early stage of my research. I feel very blessed to be part of such a dedicated team and look forward to making an effective and meaningful contribution to the work of the Healthy Working Group.

 

Email: B.Yue@massey.ac.nz

Contact

For further information about the Healthy Work Group, please contact Dr Natalia D'Souza n.j.dsouza@massey.ac.nz