1930’s relic passed to Miramar homeowner

1930’s relic passed to Miramar homeowner

Robyn Ching was delighted when she was gifted the historical document PHOTO: MERIANA JOHNSEN

Robyn Ching was delighted when she was gifted the historical document PHOTO: MERIANA JOHNSEN

Robyn Ching was delighted when she was gifted the historical document PHOTO: MERIANA JOHNSEN

It is an area well known for its early state-housing development, which is commemorated by the marble sign at the end of Crawford Green.

Named after James Crawford, the original settler of Miramar, the quiet, unassuming street still features a number of homes in the 1930’s bungalow style.

The history of Crawford Green is somewhat eclipsed by the legacy of adjoining Fife Lane, which is home to the first state house in New Zealand.

Some will be familiar with the black and white photo of then Prime Minister Michael Savage carrying a dining table onto the property, commemorating the opening of the state house in 1937.

Crawford Green may be the less famous street on the block, but it too has maintained its own piece of history from Miramar’s suburban early years.

Resident Robyn Ching holds the 79-year old blueprints for her property at number 19.

Final photo 2

(L-R) Photos of the interior taken in 2002, the property as it stands now, and the original specifications PHOTO: MERIANA JOHNSEN

Despite its age, the document is in good condition and the hand-written blue and black notations of the builder W.E Jones and owner, W.E Hooker, are still clearly readable.

Ching was “very pleased” to receive the documents 10 years ago from a local resident who found them among her grandmother’s things.

“She just wanted someone with a tie to the place to have it,” she said.

Robyn Ching has lived in this house on the corner of Crawford Green and Fife Lane in Miramar for 15 years.

Despite renovations to the property after its purchase in 2002, the bungalow has maintained much of its original design.

“We have retained the bay windows which were a very popular architectural feature back then,” said Ching.

Whilst the documents have more significance to her daughter, who is an architect, Ching still considers it a “nice thing to keep”.

She is undecided on what she will do with the documents once she leaves.

“I will either pass them over to the next person, or it could be of interest to the history of the area,” she said.

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Article by Meriana Johnsen

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Article by Meriana Johnsen

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