Community give back at surf club art auction

Community give back at surf club art auction

Expert auctioneer Ian Patterson in his element and hunting for the highest bidder at the Lyall Bay SLSC’s Art for the Sea auction. PHOTO: Rosa Woods.

Wellingtonians showed their support for the Lyall Bay Surf Life Saving Club and the construction of its new clubhouse by raising over $50,000 at an art auction last week.

The club’s donation manager Ian McIntosh said the clubhouse had become rundown to the point of disrepair after over 60 years of use. It had “enough funds for the shell of the building but not enough to complete it.

The club hosted an Art for the Sea auction to raise money to complete the clubhouse, which began construction last November.

The auction featured 20 New Zealand artists, who used paddle boards and sections of original native timber from the 1950’s clubhouse to form the canvasses for their art. All work was donated.

Buyers of the unique and beautiful artworks were thrilled to take home a piece of Wellington’s history.

However, some artworks were too large for the average home and were instead crowd-funded then donated back to the club.

Auction attendees admiring a vibrant piece of artwork created by artist Dside. PHOTO: Rosa Woods.

Auction attendees admiring a vibrant piece of artwork created by artist Dside. PHOTO: Rosa Woods.

Over 50 individuals chipped in to purchase two five-metre wooden long boards, which sold for $5000 each.

The long boards will be displayed when the new clubhouse opens in October.

McIntosh said he was “absolutely stoked” with how the event went. “We were really pleased with the funds we raised” and were “overwhelmed by the generosity of the artists”.

Artist Juliet Best said she and the other artists volunteered to paint so that all the proceeds could go back to the club. “Surf life-saving is a wonderful sport. I’m pretty excited about the new clubrooms,” she said.

Wellington’s deputy mayor and part-time artist Paul Eagle said contributing an artwork for the auction was the least he could do.

It was a great feeling to help the club out. “They literally save lives patrolling the beaches,” he said.

Anthony Edmonds said he deliberately bought a piece to put back into the club. “The history can stay within the club,” he said.

The club will hold a number of other fundraising events  including Music for the Sea and Food for the Sea.

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Article by Rosa Woods

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