Future of historic Hataitai bowling club known soon

Future of historic Hataitai bowling club known soon

Hataitai Community Recreation Trustees Adolf Stroombergen and Roy Smith stand on the bowling green in front of the historic bowling club building. PHOTO: LOUIS DAVIS

Hataitai community is deciding the fate of its iconic, yellow-stickered bowling club building.

Community consultation is underway to find out what Hataitai people want to make of the earthquake-prone bowling club building.

Over 200 people have answered an online survey conducted by Lumin and the results will be made public in mid-June.

The bowling club building is over 100 years old and needs earthquake strengthening, but it is unclear whether the building should be supported, renovated or demolished and rebuilt.

Turning the bowling club into a theatre room, a cricket ground and facility, or creating a soundproof music room with a stage are all potential options for the building. Only one thing is certain: the historic treasures of the building, such as old photographs and trophies, will be saved and transferred to the upgraded building.

Hataitai Community Recreation Trust and Feasibility committee member Adolf Stroombergen said it was important to let the community decide what should be done with the building. His personal views should not influence the decision.

Trustee and Residents Association member Roy Smith said the building could become a kitchen, office or function space – but it was ultimately up to the community.

“We’re not representative of the community. We’re reflective of white, middle-aged men.”

Smith said it was crucial to preserve the history of the bowling club no matter what happened with the building.

Lumin consultant Esther Bukholt said she had received an overwhelming amount of feedback from the consultation which pointed towards ensuring the building was kept a community space.

“I keep hearing the word community. Even a 12-year-old was using the word community.”

The bowling club building has a yellow sticker, noting its earthquake-prone structure, from the Wellington City Council. The building must be strengthened by 2028.

In December, 2017, the Lotteries Grants Board granted $56,000 to the HCRT for the survey of residents to take place in 2018.

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Article by Louis Davis

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