Victoria University offers Karori campus properties to original owners

Victoria University offers Karori campus properties to original owners

The property at 27 Campbell Street that has been offered back to the Taylor family, as listed by Re/Max.

The first public listing related to the sale of the Karori education campus was not made by the Victoria University, but by the property’s original owners who have right of first refusal under the Public Works Act.

The two-storey house at 27 Campbell Street was listed on March 17th by realty firm Re/Max Synrg and invited expressions of interest in the property.

The Karori Education campus has been embroiled in controversy following the university’s announcement last August that it intends to sell the site which it bought from the Ministry of Education for $10 in 2014.

The original owners, the Taylor family, were offered the right of first refusal on the property by the university as a requirement of the Public Works Act.

A Victoria University spokesperson said, “Once the campus was declared surplus to requirements in August 2016, the provisions of the Public Works Act applied to all of the land at the Karori campus.”

“The Act requires land that is surplus to requirements to be offered back to the original owner or their successor unless it is required for an alternative public work or if certain specified exemptions apply.

“The property at 27 Campbell Street is subject to this offer back provision.”

27 Campbell Street is one of five properties on the campus that had been offered back to the original owners, said the spokesperson. The offers are valid for 40 working days.

The financial details of the offer are confidential but in general the Public Works Act requires that land be offered back at the current market rate, the Victoria University spokesperson said.

Wellington city councillor Andy Foster said the council is indicating the campus land it is interested in and for what purpose under the Public Works Act.

“Because the university is selling land acquired under the Public Works Act, they have to go through the original owners.

“They are currently offering back to the original owners – some they don’t have to – and some they do,” Foster said.

Re/Max sales consultant John Duncan said the Taylor family was seeking expressions of interest in order to decide whether to buy the property. “There is expense with the sale of any property, but this one is a bit complicated.”

The expressions of interest had been strong, and although specific offers were confidential “the question is whether it is a six or a seven figure”, Duncan said.

 

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Article by Baz Macdonald

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