Make a change to change the world

Become an active global citizen helping to address fundamental worldwide issues across all arenas of society.

 

Our programmes

* Photo credit: NZ Story photographer

Our people

From protecting our borders to combating global issues like poverty and inequality, meet some of our alumni who are using their skills to make the world a better place. Read their stories to find out their views on what it means to be an active global citizen.

  • Andy Scott

    "Being a global citizen is about looking at your impact on a larger scale and not concerning yourself only with what is in the immediate area because today we are all interconnected."

    With an ever shrinking world New Zealand’s voice in it becomes increasingly important, Wing Commander Andy Scott says. "Standing up for what is right and helping where we can becomes critical to who we are as New Zealanders and how the world sees us."

    Hundreds of years ago New Zealand seemed a very long way from anywhere. With improved communication and transportation there is no such thing as isolation anymore and New Zealand has prospered because of this, Andy says. Therefore it is important to understand the systems which our lifestyle depends on and what has shaped the world we live in so we make the right choices for New Zealand and our neighbourhood.

    Andy developed his understanding of this through Massey University where he completed a Master of International Security with distinction in 2014.

    "Being a global citizen is about looking at your impact on a larger scale and not concerning yourself only with what is in the immediate area because today we are all interconnected. It is about being active and looking for opportunities where you can make a bigger impact on the world."

  • Loren Rutherford

    "With all the travel I have done in my life, the one thing I’ve learnt is that there are more similarities between people than there are differences."

    Living and working in southern Africa for almost 20 years I was regularly exposed to inequality, corruption and poverty. I worked in the tourism industry, which I loved, but I was always surprised by the number of unsuccessful tourism development projects I saw. These projects never consulted with industry and therefore were unable to add value to the communities as they had intended. I thought there’s got to be a better way.

    I am constantly inspired by the Ghandi quote “be the change that you wish to see in the world” as it shifts responsibility for big problems to the individual level. So I left tourism and decided to study full time as a distance student, firstly for a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, and now for a Master of International Development.

    With all the travel I have done in my life, the one thing I’ve learnt is that there are more similarities between people than there are differences. There are no bad people, and everyone has similar hopes and aspirations.

    To me, active global citizenship means recognising that poverty isn’t natural or acceptable, it’s man-made and so we can do something about it. I want to encourage people to work together so we can do things better. After finishing my master’s degree, I hope to go back to Africa to work towards making tourism more sustainable and beneficial to communities.

  • Samantha Jones

    "Active global citizenship means understanding how the decisions we make affect our global neighbours."

    Studying international security at Massey University got Samantha Jones thinking about global issues. But she did more than think.

    In 2015, Samantha founded Little Yellow Bird. The Wellington-based company designs, sources and sells ethically manufactured workwear for corporates. The clothing is made in India where workers are provided with fair wages and safe working conditions. The company’s factories and suppliers have Fairtrade certifications.

    "Active global citizenship means understanding how the decisions we make affect our global neighbours," Samantha says.

    "If we care about a world where everyone has the right to safe working conditions we have to care about where the goods we buy, such as clothing, carpet, chocolate and coffee, come from."

    In addition, there are no longer enough resources to continue consuming at the rate we are, she says.

    "If we want to preserve the world we live in it is increasingly important we buy items that are more sustainably grown and produced."

Why Massey?

Massey is New Zealand’s only truly national university. We are the engine that is driving change in New Zealand and the world. Our teaching is research-led delivered by world-renowned lecturers. With the option to study on-campus at Auckland, Manawatū or Wellington, via distance learning, or a combination of both you’ll have the flexibility to make study suit you.

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