Research projects and results

Research group

School of Psychology staff and postgraduate students need participants for their research projects and online research surveys. The surveys below are open to the public and we would appreciate you taking the time to help us with our research.

Past online surveys

  • See summaries of results of past online surveys at Survey results.
  • See Closed surveys for recent surveys. The researchers are analysing their data and writing up the results for publication.

Projects and surveys currently collecting data

Emotional Labour in Customer Service

Jean Buerano –This research is a partial requirement for a Master’s degree

Working in customer service isn’t easy! There would be days when you won’t experience positive emotions at work, but still be required to smile and be friendly to customers.  It takes effort to outwardly project an emotion you don’t really feel. This effort is called emotional labour, which can leave you physically and emotionally exhausted.

Do you want to learn more about emotional labour?

Do you want to learn strategies that you can use to feel less exhausted and more satisfied with your job?

If you are 16 years or older and work as a cashier/ checkout operator, I would like to invite you to take part in my research. The survey should take you approximately 15 minutes to complete. The feedback you provide will help organisations and researchers to better understand, improve, and provide a more favourable employee experience for customer service workers.

Please feel free to share the survey link/URL if you know of anyone who works as a cashier/checkout operator, it would be greatly appreciated. As a way of thanking you for your contribution, a summary of the findings will be sent to you should you request this.

Access: Emotional Labour in Customer Service
Project opens – 19/07/2019

Developing a Treatment Manual Based on 3-Part Model of Psychological Resilience (3-PR) for High-Risk Occupations and Student Populations

Sara Chettiar - This research is for a doctorate in psychology

I am currently seeking participants to join in my study and benefit from free psychological intervention sessions.

This study invites you to help us examine the effectiveness of a psychological resilience treatment manual specifically designed to help individuals to cope better with daily stress, increase general well-being and reduce stress symptoms.

This study involves attending an hour a week session for 16 weeks. There will also be an additional introductory session. These sessions will be conducted by the primary researcher who is a PhD student under the supervision of the main supervisor who is a clinical psychologist. All sessions for this research will be held at the Psychology Clinic, Wallace St, Mount Cook, Wellington 6021, Massey University campus.

Project opens –15th July 2019
Project closes - 19th August 2019
More details on eligibility and how to take part in this study.

Indian Migrants’ Stories at Different Degrees of Employment

Sumedha Hariswamy - This research is in partial fulfilment for a Master's degree in Psychology

We are currently seeking Indian migrants to complete an online survey.
We are interested to learn about the stories of Indian migrants’ job-hunting journey and their transition from unemployment and under-employment to attaining full employment. The findings from this research may help newcomer Indians navigate their job-hunting journey.
You can participate in this study if you:

  • Have come/came to New Zealand as an Indian migrant
  • Are a person of Indian origin
  • Are either currently unemployed/seeking employment, underemployed (entry-level or intermediate level) or are fully employed (in a job that matches your skills and qualifications)
  • Are 18 years or older
  • Speak English fluently

If you meet these criteria, I warmly invite you to participate.  You will be asked to fill out an online survey, which takes approximately 10-15 minutes to complete. We would like to ask you about the critical incidents in your job-hunting journey of looking for work in New Zealand. Critical incidents are simply short stories detailing positive outcomes where you found success (i.e. got a job) and negative outcomes where you faced barriers (i.e. did not get a job).
The survey also contains information about relevant services if you experience unpleasant memories of job-hunting.

Access: Indian Migrants’ Stories at Different Degrees of Employment
Project opens - 12/03/2019
Project closed - 17 May 2019

Positive Psychological Changes in People Living with HIV

Danni Chi –This research is in partial fulfilment for a PhD's degree in Psychology

I am currently seeking participants to join in my study.

This study invites you to help us understand your experience of living with HIV. It will help clarify what kind of thinking and actions lead to positive psychological changes, and further assist to improve clinical services. This study is totally voluntary, and all information that would lead to your identities will be confidential. It will be conducted through the phone interview, which will take approximately 1 hour.

If you are diagnosed with HIV for at least one year, at the age of 18 or older and after the year 1996, on HIV medication and not currently engaged in psychological therapy, speaking English and living in New Zealand, you might be eligible to participate this study. You will receive a copy of research findings and a $40 supermarket gift card from New World as compensation for your time.

For more information, please see the information sheet and associated registration page. If you have interest, please leave your contact information here and I will get back to you soon, or contact me directly by email at danni.chi.1@uni.massey.ac.nz or by phone at 021 084 35778 or my main supervisor Dr Ian de Terte by email at I.deTerte@massey.ac.nz or by phone at (04) 979 3603.

Access: Positive Psychological Changes in People Living with HIV
Project opens – Feb 2019
Project closed - 16 April 2019

Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Other Mental Health Factors in Young Adults

Emily Cory - This research is being conducted as a partial requirement for a Doctorate of Clinical Psychology.

I am currently seeking participants to complete an online survey.

The purpose of this study is to investigate the links between non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), personality, and mental health factors. NSSI refers to the socially unacceptable destruction of one’s own body tissue without the intent to commit suicide. NSSI is not uncommon in New Zealand and more research is needed to understand what factors promote and protect against engaging in NSSI.

Participants must be aged between 18 and 35 years, live in New Zealand and be proficient in the English language. If you meet these criteria, I warmly invite you to participate. You will be asked to fill out an online survey, which takes approximately 10-25 minutes to complete. The survey includes questions about your own experiences with NSSI (if you have any) and other personal beliefs and ways of thinking. Participants who complete the survey can choose to participate in a random prize draw to win one of 30 $25 USD Amazon vouchers. The survey also contains information about relevant services if you are experiencing psychological distress.

Access: Mental health factors in young adults
Project opens - 31/08/2018

Have you ever wondered how Third Wave Therapies overlap? Creating a Compendium of Third Wave Therapy Strategies.

Michelle Rous – Research is a partial requirement for a Master’s degree in Psychology

This research investigates the relationship between strategies used by therapists in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Dialectical Behaviour Therapy and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy. Whilst all therapies have strategies considered ‘central’ to them, strategies are often very similar or the same across different therapies. This research seeks to identify the areas of overlap, similarity and difference, and represent these relationships in a model.

If you are a therapist in a mental health discipline, I welcome you to take part in this study. This involves sorting cards of strategies from these therapies, following a set of instructions. I will mail all the required materials to you, regardless of your location, and you can simply email the necessary forms back. To thank you for your contribution, a summary of the findings will be sent to you should you request this.

Access: Third Wave Therapies: Information sheet and instructions
Project opens - 12/09/2017

Leadership and employee wellbeing in information technology (IT) related work

Suzanne Davies - This research is a partial requirement for a Master’s degree

Despite overwhelming evidence demonstrating a positive relationship between constructive leadership behaviours and employee psychological wellbeing; occupational burnout and low engagement are found to be the norm in employees with low coping strategies or resilience. This research aims to explore how leadership is related to employee burnout and engagement, and whether employees’ psychological flexibility (resilience) can enhance their well-being. It also investigates if high strain roles exist beyond occupations where employees perform frontline work.

If you are 18 years or older, employed on IT related projects and reside in Australia or New Zealand you are invited to participate. Participation involves completing an online questionnaire, taking no longer than 15 - 20 minutes.
Should you not be involved in IT related project work, but know of someone who is, please forward this research request onto them. As a way of thanking participants for their contribution a summary of the findings will be provided on request.

Access: Leadership and employee wellbeing in IT project work
Survey opens – 20/07/17

Have you ever come close to death? Sleep habits after a near-death incident

Natasha Tassell-Matamua (Staff member from the School of Psychology)

I am interested in exploring the sleep habits of people who have experienced a near-death incident. I would like to know whether your sleep habits have changed since your near-death incident, and if so, in what ways. It is possible they may not have changed at all, and I am also interested in this.

If you are over the age of 18 years and feel you have had a near-death incident at some time in your life, then I would like to invite you to take part in this research. A ‘near-death incident’ may be defined as any event where you experienced some physiological / physical impairment, and were unconscious for a period of time, and may or may not have been clinically dead. Some examples of a near-death incident may include physical trauma associated with a car accident, a heart attack, surgery, near-drowning, near-suicide, assault, childbirth, coma, head trauma, among others.

Access - Survey: Near death incidences and sleep habits
Survey opened: 2/11/2016

Near Death Experiences and Attitudes to Death

Nicole Lindsay, This research is a partial requirement for completing a Masters of Arts degree in Psychology.

This research is interested in exploring Near Death Experiences (NDEs) and corresponding attitudes toward death. If you have had an experience where you were dead, dying or close to death then you are invited to take part in this research. You may or may not have a conscious memory of this episode. An NDE is defined as an experience where you felt as though something unusual yet significant happened to you during this time, such as leaving your physical body; seeing an unusual light or meeting deceased relatives. Your participation is also welcome if you have had a close brush with death but do not recall any unusual memories from this time. This online survey is completely anonymous and will approximately 20 minutes.

Access - Survey on Near Death Experiences and Attitudes to Death
Survey opened: 11/09/2014

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