Are you ready for postgraduate study?

class-2.jpg Successful postgraduate study depends on organising your time to ensure you meet required timeframes. You must also have the necessary study and research skills to undertake study at a higher level. Use these interactive tools to assess your study and research skills, and work out if you are able to dedicate the needed time to your postgraduate studies.

Postgraduate readiness quizzes

Below are two tools to help you prepare for postgraduate study. Each of these quizzes take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Any responses given will be completely anonymous.

The Postgraduate Study Readiness Quiz will help you think about different aspects of postgraduate study and how it differs from undergraduate study. It will also help you consider how they match with your own expectations. 

The Postgraduate Research Skills Quiz will help you think about the research skills required for postgraduate study. 

Each quiz includes helpful advice and links to further information and resources.

Plain text versions of each quiz are also available in the form of information sheets:

Finding time for study

Studying at university requires a significant time investment. Students often comment that balancing their everyday commitments with study requirements can be quite challenging. It is important to carefully consider how many papers you should take, especially when beginning your study. 
You should be realistic about the number of papers you can take in a semester and consider all your existing commitments. You will need to spend approximately 10 to 12 hours each week for a 15-credit single semester paper, or about 5 to 6 hours per week for a 15-credit double semester paper.
To help identify how you could fit study into your regular routine, we have provided two tools:

Studying at university requires a significant time investment. Students often comment that balancing their everyday commitments with study requirements can be quite challenging. It is important to carefully consider how many courses you should take, especially when beginning your study.

You should be realistic about the number of courses you can take in a semester and consider all your existing commitments. You will need to spend approximately 10 to 12 hours each week for a 15-credit single semester course, or about 5 to 6 hours per week for a 15-credit double semester course.

To help identify how you could fit study into your regular routine, we have provided two tools:

Workload planning tool - an interactive tool which displays a list of everyday activities and asks you to estimate how much time you spend on activities each week. It also asks you how many courses you want to take, and will provide you with some helpful feedback on your results.

Time Management Strategies Presentation – This provides some useful tips on how to manage your time successfully and fit in everything you need to. It was initially designed for distance students, but the information and strategies are relevant to all postgraduate students. Working out how your studies will fit with your other commitments is an important part of the decision to enrol.

A plain text version of the Time Management Strategies Presentation is also available.

Establishing your motivations for study

write.jpg What are your motivations for undertaking the commitment of further study? Being clear about your reasons for studying can help you to stay motivated while studying. Your reasons for postgraduate study may include, but will certainly not be limited to:

  • The ‘natural progression’ from undergraduate to postgraduate studies
  • Progress towards an academic career
  • Personal development
  • Personal interest 
  • Upgrading skills and knowledge in a chosen field
  • Becoming more specialised in a chosen field
  • Higher salary in a current or new job
  • Career progression in a chosen field
  • Gaining an ‘edge’ in the job market
  • Meeting the requirements for a specific job
  • Making a career change

To help establish your reasons for studying you could: 

  • Discuss your reasons for study with friends, family, or students who have followed a similar study path.
  • Contact us to speak with the postgraduate co-ordinator at your College. They can answer your questions about programme of study and how they might fit with the goals you have identified.
  • Contact Massey University's Career and Employment Service, which has services particularly designed to help prospective postgraduate students in their decision making.
  • Contact the Graduate Research School for information and advice if you are considering enrolling in doctoral study.

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