Veterinary sciences and public health research

Research in this area concentrates on major national and international animal health issues. There is a particular emphasis on emerging problems in food safety and public health.  The veterinary sciences and public health teams include a wide range of specialists in veterinary sciences.  These include experts in epidemiology, molecular biology, public health and food safety, pathology, infectious diseases, aquaculture, and animal behaviour and welfare.  

The team also train future scientists and veterinarians from undergraduate to postgraduate levels.

Current research areas

Animal welfare and behaviour

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Animal welfare and behaviour

The Massey University Centre for practical, science-based and ethical advice, education and solutions to animal welfare and behaviour problems and for bioethical analysis and education

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Infectious diseases

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Infectious diseases

Research includes a broad range of areas related to infectious diseases of veterinary and public health importance. These include diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, parasites or viruses.

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Pathobiology

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Pathobiology

Our research focuses particularly on the mechanisms of disease development and diagnosis. This includes infectious diseases, cancer, toxicities, nutritional diseases, and genetic diseases.

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Endocrinology

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Endocrinology

We use radioimmunoassay and ELISA methods to measure hormones and other biological compounds for commercial clients, in collaborative research projects, and for student and staff projects.

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Epidemiology

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Epidemiology

Massey University has three main groups focusing on epidemiological research and studies. These are the EpiCentre, mEpiLab and Infectious Diseases Research Centre.

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Research and projects

Examples of projects from veterinary science researchers at Massey University.

Clue to Ebola in bat breeding

Research by Massey's Dr David Hayward has found that the bi-annual birthing pattern of bats may be the key that helps the deadly Ebola virus persist.

Pets and antibiotic resistance

A Massey University led research study is looking at how drug-resistant bacteria may be spread in households – including whether pets and suburban wild birds transmit antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Key contacts

Massey Contact Centre Mon - Fri 8:30am to 5:00pm 0800 MASSEY (+64 6 350 5701) TXT 5222 contact@massey.ac.nz Web chat Staff Alumni News Māori @ Massey