Dr Anne Wignall staff profile picture

Contact details +64 (09) 414 0800  ext. 43511

Dr Anne Wignall

Senior Lecturer

Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences

I am an ecologist who uses invertebrate model systems, particularly spiders and insects, to answer evolutionary questions. My research spans communication systems, predator-prey interactions, sexual selection and resource allocation strategies.

Professional

Contact details

  • Location: 02, 20
    Campus: Albany

Research Expertise

Research Interests

Evolutionary ecology

Behavioural ecology

Invertebrate biology

Sexual selection

Predator-prey interactions

Animal communication

Thematics

Resource Development and Management

Area of Expertise

Field of research codes
Animal Behaviour (060801): Behavioural Ecology (060201): Biological Sciences (060000): Ecology (060200): Invertebrate Biology (060808): Zoology (060800)

Research Projects

Summary of Research Projects

Position Current Completed
Project Leader 3 3

Research Outputs

Journal

O Hanlon, JC., Wignall, AE., & Herberstein, ME. (2018). Short and fast vs long and slow: age changes courtship in male orb-web spiders (Argiope keyserlingi). Science of Nature. 105(1-2)
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Bulbert, M., & Wignall, AE. (2016). Luring. Current Biology. 26(23), R1212-R1213
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Magris, M., Wignall, AE., & Herberstein, ME. (2015). The sterile male technique: Irradiation negatively affects male fertility but not male courtship. Journal of Insect Physiology. 75, 85-90
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., Kemp, DJ., & Herberstein, ME. (2014). Extreme short-term repeatability of male courtship performance in a tropical orb-web spider. Behavioral Ecology. 25(5), 1083-1088
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Herberstein, ME., Wignall, AE., Hebets, EA., & Schneider, JM. (2014). Dangerous mating systems: Signal complexity, signal content and neural capacity in spiders. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. 46(P4), 509-518
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Herberstein, ME. (2013). The Influence of Vibratory Courtship on Female Mating Behaviour in Orb-Web Spiders (Argiope keyserlingi, Karsch 1878). PLoS ONE. 8(1)
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Herberstein, ME. (2013). Male courtship vibrations delay predatory behaviour in female spiders. Scientific Reports. 3
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Herberstein, ME., Wignall, AE., Nessler, SH., Harmer, AMT., & Schneider, JM. (2012). How effective and persistent are fragmentsof male genitalia as mating plugs?. Behavioral Ecology. 23(5), 1140-1145
[Journal article]Authored by: Harmer, A., Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., Jackson, RR., Wilcox, RS., & Taylor, PW. (2011). Exploitation of environmental noise by an araneophagic assassin bug. Animal Behaviour. 82(5), 1037-1042
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Taylor, PW. (2011). Assassin bug uses aggressive mimicry to lure spider prey. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 278(1710), 1427-1433
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Taylor, PW. (2010). Predatory behaviour of an araneophagic assassin bug. Journal of Ethology. 28(3), 437-445
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Taylor, PW. (2009). Alternative predatory tactics of an araneophagic assassin bug (Stenolemus bituberus). Acta Ethologica. 12(1), 23-27
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Taylor, PW. (2009). Responses of an araneophagic assassin bug, Stenolemus bituberus, to spider draglines. Ecological Entomology. 34(3), 415-420
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Taylor, PW. (2008). Biology and life history of the araneophagic assassin bug Stenolemus bituberus including a morphometric analysis of the instars (Heteroptera, Reduviidae). Journal of Natural History. 42(1-2), 59-76
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Taylor, PW., Roberts, JA., Wignall, AE., & Uetz, GW. (2008). Foreleg autotomy reduces mating success of male Schizocosa ocreata wolf spiders. Journal of Insect Behavior. 21(4), 193-202
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Taylor, PW. (2008). Growth and development of an araneophagic assassin bug, Stenolemus bituberus (Heteroptera:Reduviidae). Australian Journal of Zoology. 56(4), 249-255
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., Heiling, AM., Cheng, K., & Herberstein, ME. (2006). Flower symmetry preferences in honeybees and their crab spider predators. Ethology. 112(5), 510-518
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Cheng, K., & Wignall, AE. (2006). Honeybees (Apis mellifera) holding on to memories: Response competition causes retroactive interference effects. Animal Cognition. 9(2), 141-150
[Journal article]Authored by: Wignall, A.

Book

Herberstein, ME., & Wignall, AE. (2011). Deceptive signals in spiders. In ME. Herberstein (Ed.) Spider Behaviour. (pp. 190 - 214). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
[Chapter]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Herberstein, ME., & Wignall, AE. (2011). Introduction: spider biology. In ME. Herberstein (Ed.) Spider Behaviour: Flexibility and Versatility. (pp. 1 - 30). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
[Chapter]Authored by: Wignall, A.

Conference

Wignall, AE., & Herberstein, ME. (2017, July). Phylogenetically conserved courtship signalling in web-building spiders. Presented at Behaviour 2017 - 35th International Ethological Conference. Estoril, Portugal.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Edirisinghe, H., Leschen, R., Dale, J., & Wignall, AE. (2017, April). Phenotypic variation in ladybirds (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Presented at The 66th Entomological Society of New Zealand Conference. Wellington, New Zealand.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Dale, J., Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Herberstein, ME. (2017, April). Phylogenetically conserved courtship signalling in web-building spiders. Presented at The 66th Entomological Society of New Zealand Conference. Wellington, New Zealand.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Gokhale, C. (2016, November). The evolution of flexible predatory strategies in jumping spiders. Presented at Australian Entomological Society 47th AGM and Scientific Conference and Entomological Society of New Zealand – 2016 Conference. Melbourne, Australia.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE. (2015). Killer instinct: understanding the evolution of flexible predatory strategies. Poster session presented at the meeting of Behaviour 2015 - 34th International Ethological Conference. Cairns, Australia
[Conference Poster]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE. (2015, April). Sex lies and rock'n'roll: Signal function and evolution in spider webs. Presented at 64th Annual Conference of the Entomological Society of New Zealand. Auckland, New Zealand.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Soley, FG., Wignall, AE., & Taylor, PW. (2013, August). Risk-dependent predatory behaviour of an araneophagic assassin bug.. Presented at Behaviour 2013. Newcastle Gateshead, England.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Herberstein, ME. (2012, November). Signalling on the web: the function and evolution of courtship 'shudders' in male web-building spiders. Presented at 43rd AGM & Scientific Conference of the Australian Entomological Society and Australasian Arachnological Society.. Tasmania, Australia.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Herberstein, ME. (2012, August). Good vibrations reduce aggression in female spiders. Presented at 14th Congress of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology.. Lund, Sweden.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., Kemp, DJ., & Herberstein, ME. (2012). Repeatability and the structure of male courtship in Argiope spiders. Poster session presented at the meeting of Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour (ASSAB 2012). Geelong, Australia
[Conference Poster]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Taylor, PW., Wignall, AE., & Jackson, RR. (2011, July). Assassin bugs crack the code of spider perception.. Presented at Behaviour 2011: Joint Meeting of the Animal Behavior Society & International Ethological Conference.. Bloomington, USA.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Herberstein, ME. (2011, April). Male or meal?: the function of 'shuddering' by male spiders.. Presented at Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour.. South Australia, Australia.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Herberstein, ME. (2010, September). Strumming on silk: are courtship vibrations an indicator of male quality and do they predict mating success in spiders?. Presented at 13th International Behavioral Ecology Congress.. Perth, Australia.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE. (2010, April). Courtship behaviour in an orb-web spider, Argiope keyserlingi.. Presented at Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour.. Narrabri, Australia.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., Schaber, CF., & Taylor, PW. (2009, April). Vibrations in 3-dimensional spider webs: what characterises prey?. Presented at Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour.. Auckland, New Zealand.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., Wilcox, RS., & Taylor, PW. (2008, March). On shaky ground: the exploitation of smokescreens by hunting assassin bugs.. Presented at Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour.. Coffs Harbour, Australia.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Prenter, J., Soley, FA., Wignall, AE., & Taylor, PW. (2008). Assassin assignations: mating in the Australian assassin bug Stenolemus bituberus.. Poster session presented at the meeting of Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Coffs Harbour, Australia
[Conference Poster]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE. (2008). Araneophagic assassin bugs exploit spider traces as predatory cues.. Poster session presented at the meeting of Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Coffs Harbour, Australia
[Conference Poster]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., Mankin, R., Evans, CS., & Taylor, P. (2007, April). A wolf in flies' clothing: do assassin bugs mimic prey in spider webs?. Presented at Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour.. Canberra, Australia.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., Mankin, R., Evans, CS., & Taylor, PW. (2007, July). When prey bites back: an assassin bug that appears to aggressively mimic prey to hunt spiders.. Presented at Animal Behavior Society Annual Meeting.. Vermont, USA.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Taylor, P. (2007, August). Spider cues indicate prey presence to araneophagic assassin bugs.. Presented at 17th International Congress of Arachnology.. Sao Paulo, Brazil.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Taylor, PW. (2007, August). To kill or be killed: predatory behaviour of an araneophagic assassin bug, Stenolemus bituberus (Heteroptera, Reduviidae).. Presented at Interational Ethological Conference.. Nova Scotia, Canada.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Evans, CS., Wignall, AE., & Evans, L. (2006, August). Crowing functions as an 'all clear' signal in fowl (Gallus gallus).. Presented at Animal Behavior Society Annual Meeting.. Utah, USA.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., Mankin, R., Evans, CS., & Taylor, PW. (2006, September). Do hunting assassin bugs, Stenolemus bituberus, aggressively mimic insect prey in spider webs?. Presented at Australian and New Zealand Entomological Societies' Conference.. South Australia, Australia.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., & Taylor, PW. (2006). To catch a spider: do hunting Stenolemus bituberus aggressively mimic insect prey in webs?. Poster session presented at the meeting of Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Sydney, Australia
[Conference Poster]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Heiling, AM., Wignall, AE., Cheng, K., Chittka, L., & Herberstein, ME. (2005, December). Evolution of flower signal exploitation by crab spiders.. Presented at The Combined Australian Entomological Society, Society of Australian Systematic Biologists and Invertebrate Biodiversity and Conservation Conference.. Canberra, Australia.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.
Wignall, AE., Heiling, AE., Cheng, K., & Herberstein, ME. (2003, April). Floral symmetry, crab spiders and honeybees.. Presented at Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour.. Canberra, Australia.
[Conference Oral Presentation]Authored by: Wignall, A.

Supervision and Teaching

Summary of Doctoral Supervision

Position Current Completed
Supervisor 2 0

Teaching

199.211 Invertebrate Zoology

199.312 Behavioural Ecology

Courses Coordinated

Current Doctoral Supervision

Supervisor of:

  • Alison Hunt - Doctor of Philosophy
    The influence of personality and cognition on antagonistic interactions
  • Heshani Edirisinghe - Doctor of Philosophy
    Biology and behaviour of New Zealand ladybirds

Media and Links

Media

  • 28 Jan 2013 - Magazine, Online
    Science Magazine article on research
    Science Magazine article no research by Joseph Bennington-Castro (ScienceShot): The smooth moves of the male orb-web spider.
  • 23 Apr 2015 - Online
    Jumping spiders: good things come in small package
    Blog article for Sciblogs
  • 20 Dec 2013 - Online
    Rocking the webs saves males from becoming dinner
    ABC Science. News in Science by Stuart Gary. Online article about research
  • 20 Dec 2013 - Online
    i09 article by Joseph Bennington-Castro
    Male spiders 'shudder' to calm their cannibalistic brides: online news article on research
  • 19 Mar 2015 - Online, Radio
    Spider chatter on the web
    Interview with Radio NZ: Our Changing World
  • 19 Dec 2013 - Online, Magazine
    Science Magazine article on research
    Science Magazine article by Lizzie Wade (ScienceShot) "This foreplay trick will save your life (if you're a spider)

Other Links

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