Dealing with stress from disasters

collapsed house

Psychosocial support following a disaster

In the hours, days and weeks after a disaster you may come across people who are worried, anxious, and uncertain about the future. Some will have experienced damage to their property, which means that they cannot live where they normally live. Others may have experienced injury to themselves or their loved ones. What we know from the research is that most people will be ok, especially if they have their usual resources to draw upon. Others will need more support.

Dr Sarb Johal's blog provides ongoing commentary on psychosocial support.

Psychosocial fact sheets

prepared by Dr Sarb Johal and Robyn Tuohy, JCDR, Massey University.

Video presentations

Dr Sarb Johal presents a series of short video presentations.

Foundations of Psychosocial Support
The Principles of Psychosocial Support
The IASC Guidelines / residual difficulties for people after emergencies
Disasters and their impact upon mental well-being - Part 1
Disasters and their impact upon mental well-being - Part 2
Disasters and their impact upon mental well-being - Part 3
Disasters and their impact upon mental well-being - Part 4
Disasters and their impact upon mental well-being - Part 5
Ordinary reactions to extraordinary events
Psychological First Aid
The process of helping
Guidance on helping children and adolescents
Assisting adults and older adults
Individual and community supports after the Canberra bush fires
Learning from the Matata flood and landslide
Taking care of staff and yourself
Staff and staff care 
Risk communication
Some final tips and examples   

Massey Contact Centre Mon - Fri 8:30am to 5:00pm 0800 MASSEY (+64 6 350 5701) TXT 5222 contact@massey.ac.nz Web chat Staff Alumni News Māori @ Massey