Master of Construction – MConstr

Become a world-leading construction specialist, with Massey University’s Master of Construction. It is the only degree in New Zealand focused on construction.

Type of qualification

Master's degree

Level of study

Postgraduate study

Once you’ve graduated with a bachelor’s degree – or have equal experience – you can study at the postgraduate level. Doctoral qualifications require additional entry requirements.

NZQF level 9

Our courses follow the New Zealand Qualification Framework (NZQF) levels.

Find out more about NZQF levels

Time to complete

2 year(s) full-time (180 credits)
Up to 5 years part-time
Part-time available

International students

International students are not New Zealand citizens or residents.

Definition of New Zealand citizens and residents

Open to international students on campus in New Zealand, or studying on-line out
Note: 120-credit pathways available for applicants who meet Advanced Entry criteria

Study a Master of Construction – MConstr

The Master of Construction at Massey University is a unique degree. It focuses on building in-depth knowledge of specific aspects of construction. It is the only qualification in New Zealand that has specifically developed postgraduate construction courses.

This master’s qualification builds on Massey’s bachelor's degree in construction – the only one offered in New Zealand.

120-credit option

You can complete the Master of Construction with 120 credits of study if you enter via one of these Advanced Entry pathways:

  • a Bachelor of Construction plus two years of professional experience; or
  • a Bachelor of Construction (Honours); or
  • a four-year Bachelor with Honours degree in a construction-related field.

Is it right for me?

You may be working in the construction industry and want to know more about specific aspects. Or, you may work in another area (like law) and wish to learn more about related construction specialties (construction law). This degree will give you specific, tailored, focused learning to help you gain in-depth knowledge of these areas.

When you study towards Massey’s Master of Construction you will become a construction professional with expertise in:

  • construction technology
  • cost and financial aspects of construction
  • legal aspects of construction projects
  • management of construction projects.

World-leading and industry-relevant

Massey University construction staff have a wide range of industry and research experience. We have extensive contacts, know how the industry works and what potential employers are looking for. This all contributes to ensuring that our programme is kept up to date and relevant.

We encourage you to focus on a research project in an industry relevant to your own career. Or you can use our industry relationships to develop a project relevant to your career ambitions.

A sustainable view

The themes of sustainability and productivity run through all our construction courses. We have sustainability specialists who ensure that these increasingly important views of construction are always considered.

Future projects

There is a great deal of work to be done and there is high demand for graduates with your skills at all levels of the construction industry.

A MConstr is a good fit if you:

  • would like to specialise in or learn more about an area of construction
  • would like to move up the career hierarchy.

Entry requirements

Admission to Massey

All students must meet university entrance requirements to be admitted to the University.

Specific requirements

To enter the Master of Construction (thesis pathway) you will:

  • have been awarded or qualified for a construction related four year Bachelor with Honours degree or a Bachelor of Construction (Honours) or equivalent qualification with a minimum grade average of B over the contributing courses for the Honours year; or
  • have been awarded or qualified for a relevant Bachelor’s degree followed by a relevant Postgraduate Certificate with a minimum grade average of B+ over the contributing courses for the Postgraduate Certificate, or equivalent.

To enter the Master of Construction (coursework pathway) you will::

  1. have been awarded or qualified for the Bachelor of Construction or equivalent qualification with a minimum grade average of B across the highest level courses; or
  2. have been awarded or qualified for the Bachelor of Construction or equivalent qualification and have completed at least two years of relevant professional experience; or
  3. have been awarded or qualified for a construction related four year Bachelor with Honours degree or a Bachelor of Construction (Honours) or equivalent qualification; or
  4. have been awarded or qualified for the Bachelor of Construction followed by the Postgraduate Diploma in Construction or equivalent qualification with a minimum grade average of B over the contributing courses for the Postgraduate Diploma; or
  5. have been awarded or qualified for a relevant Bachelor’s degree followed by a relevant Postgraduate Certificate with a minimum grade average of B over the contributing courses for the Postgraduate Certificate, or equivalent.

If you are admitted into the thesis pathway, or the coursework pathway under 3, 4 or 5 above, you may apply for credit towards Part One of the qualification in accordance with the limits specified in the Recognition of Prior Learning regulations.

English language requirements

To study this qualification you must meet Massey University's English language standards.

Documents you will need to supply to support your application:

  • verified copies of all academic transcripts for studies taken at all universities other than Massey University
  • a copy of your current curriculum vitae (CV) including education and employment for at least the last five years
  • a short summary of your research interests (200 words or less). Required if you intend to take the research pathway.

Prior learning, credit and exemptions

For information on prior learning, exemptions and transfer of credit or other questions:

English language skills

If you need help with your English language skills before you start university, see our English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses.

Maximum time limits for completion

There are maximum time limits to complete postgraduate qualifications.  If you do not complete within the maximum time, you may be required to re-apply for the qualification if you wish to continue your studies.

Time limits for Honours, Distinction and Merit

Where your qualification is completed within the stated time limit and to a high standard, you may be able to graduate with a class of Honours, Distinction or Merit. 

Official regulations

To understand what you need to study and must complete to graduate read the official rules and regulations for this qualification.

You should read these together with all other relevant Statutes and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for Postgraduate Degrees, Postgraduate Diplomas, and Postgraduate Certificates.

Returning students

For returning students, there may be changes to the majors and minors available and the courses you need to take. Go to the section called ‘Transitional Provisions’ in the Regulations to find out more.

In some cases the qualification or specialisation you enrolled in may no longer be taking new enrolments, so may not appear on these web pages. To find information on the regulations for these qualifications go to the Massey University Calendar.

Please contact us through the Get advice button on this page if you have any questions.

Structure of the Master of Construction

If you study full-time, you’ll take 120 credits per year or 60 credits per semester.

If you enter the Master of Construction (Coursework pathway) with a Bachelor of Construction plus two years of professional experience, or Bachelor of Construction (Honours), or four year Bachelor with Honours degree, your programme will consist of 120 credits including a 45 credit research report. 

For progression from Part One to Part Two of the Master of Construction (Coursework pathway) you achieve a minimum B grade average over the first 60 credits in Part One.

For progression from Part One to Part Two of the Master of Construction (Thesis pathway) you must achieve a minimum B+ grade average over the first 60 credits in Part One.

Without specialisation

If you choose to take the ‘without specialisation’ option, you can select your courses from Schedule A (Subjects), Schedule B (Electives) and Schedule C (Research).

The programme of study for the Master of Construction without a specialisation must include 218717 for the Coursework pathway, and both 218717 and 218718 for the Thesis pathway.

Courses and specialisations

Key terms

Courses
Each qualification has its own specific set of courses. Some universities call these papers. You enrol in courses after you get accepted into Massey.
Course code
Each course is numbered using 6 digits. The fourth number shows the level of the course. For example, in course 219206, the fourth number is a 2, so it is a 200-level course (usually studied in the second year of full-time study).
Credits
Each course is worth a number of credits. You combine courses (credits) to meet the total number of credits needed for your qualification.
Specialisations
Some qualifications let you choose what subject you'd like to specialise in. Your major or endorsement is what you will take the majority of your courses in.

Credit summary

180 credits

Either: Coursework Pathway

  • Compulsory courses – 75 credits
  • Electives from Schedule B – 60 credits
  • Research report – 45 credits

Or: Research Pathway

  • Compulsory courses – 75 credits
  • Elective from Schedule B – 15 credits
  • Thesis – 90 credits

Completing a subject is optional, requiring at least 75 credits from the subject.

Advanced entry: Those who have already completed specified qualifications in advance of the minimum entry requirements and have been granted credit for it, may be able to complete this degree in 60 - 120 credits.

This is a parts-based qualification. This means there are regulations around your completion of Part One before progressing to Part Two, etc.

Course planning key

Prerequisites
Courses that need to be completed before moving onto a course at the next level. For example, a lot of 200-level courses have 100-level prerequisite courses.
Corequisites
Courses that must be completed at the same time as another course are known as corequisite courses.
Restrictions
Some courses are restricted against each other because their content is similar. This means you can only choose one of the offered courses to study and credit to your qualification.

Part One

Schedule A: Subject courses

Some qualifications let you choose what subject you'd like to specialise in. Your major or endorsement is what you will take the majority of your courses in.

Schedule B: Elective courses

Courses at 700 level from the 218 prefix
And may include up to 45 credits from
Course code: 115764 Leadership and Teamwork 15 credits

Applied and experiential study of leading and working in teams, and the interpersonal communication skills required to be successful.

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Course code: 115766 Managing Financial Resources 15 credits

The study of corporate finance and accounting functions in business, including the analysis, sourcing, and use of funds in the pursuit of organisational goals.

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Course code: 115774 Operations and Supply Chain Management 15 credits

This course examines operations management functions and methods in pursuit of sustainable organisational effectiveness.

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Course code: 115791 Digital Transformation 15 credits

Applied study of the use of digital technology to solve business problems and exploit new business opportunities.

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Course code: 130705 Emergency Management 30 credits

An examination of the social, psychological, community and organisational aspects of disaster management in New Zealand. Emphasis is on the development and implementation of an all-hazards, comprehensive and integrated approach to emergency management. Selected readings and case studies will be used to facilitate the development of an effective response to social, psychological, community and organisational issues.

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Course code: 131704 Sustainable Development 30 credits

A course concerned with the concept of sustainable development in all its dimensions (economic, social and environmental), focused on the 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs). Conceptual lenses, including Indigenous understandings of sustainability and the sustainable livelihoods framework, are also discussed.

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Course code: 131709 Sustainable Development Goals in Practice 30 credits

This course provides advanced study in the practice of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), focusing on the application of the SDGs to real-world circumstances. Students will be exposed to diverse approaches, frameworks, and tools for measuring and integrating sustainability in policy making and practice.

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Course code: 132731 Planning Law 30 credits

The Resource Management Act 1991, and the New Zealand legal system as it relates to environmental law and the planning process.

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Course code: 158738 Implementation and Management of Systems Security 15 credits

Security and privacy are important features of information systems, in particular with the case of free access, as in Web-based services or E-commerce systems. The goal is to restrict the access of information to legitimate users only. For this purpose techniques from cryptography and information theory have to be studied.

Restrictions: 157738

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Course code: 158740 Location Systems: Spatial Databases, Tools and Applications 15 credits

This course will develop knowledge and skills in the use of geographic information science in an interdisciplinary context. Students will learn how to work with clients to identify requirements, model and collect data and create a location-based web application. A range of areas and a variety of different uses of geographic information will be covered using open source tools. An interdisciplinary group project will form part of the course.

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Course code: 158741 Location Data: Mapping, Analysis and Visualisation 15 credits

This course will develop knowledge and skills in the processing, analysis and visualisation of data that has a location on the earth. Location data is more and more readily available, and students will learn how to transform and integrate data from multiple sources, consider the impact of data uncertainty and privacy, and perform appropriate analysis for environmental, social and economic applications. Different data collection methods will be discussed, and a range of open source tools will be used.

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Course code: 158757 User Interface Design and Evaluation 15 credits

Focuses on the design and evaluation of human-computer interfaces (HCI) for computerised information systems covering: task analysis, the process of design, the use of rapid prototyping in HCI design, and formative and summative usability testing, as well as the integration of user interface design techniques into the SDLC. The approach is hands-on.

Restrictions: 157757

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Course code: 178719 Climate Change Economics and Policy 30 credits

An analysis of the economics of climate change and evaluation of the mitigation options used by policy makers globally.

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Course code: 178742 Environmental Economics for Non-Economists 15 credits

Economic analysis of policy management issues in the use of natural resources and the environment. Concepts and principles will be discussed and applied to issues such as fisheries, land, water and climate change.

Restrictions: 178360 and 178762

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Course code: 178755 Economic Growth, International and Development Economics 30 credits

A critical assessment of topics from economic growth, international economics and the nature and measurement of development. There is an emphasis on the empirical and policy implications of development strategies including the relationship between managing development, role of the State, international economy, globalisation, trade theory and policy, global crises, and macroeconomic policy.

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Course code: 240753 Supply Chain Analytics 15 credits

Determining information required for management of the supply chain. Includes a systems dynamics view of production management, process improvement methodologies, supply chain measurements and analysis.

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Course code: 240756 Value Chain Management 15 credits

Value chains are explored through a supply chain operations management lens. Value chain networks are examined in the context of supply chain collaboration and coordination. The purpose is to provide students with the core principles of value creation and management, and to introduce them to supply chain analytical approaches to facilitate business decision making.

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Course code: 287735 Quality Improvement 15 credits

Concepts of and the major approaches to quality improvement. The full range of quality improvement methodologies, tools and techniques as well as team-based problem-solving methods.

Restrictions: 143785

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Course code: 287741 Quality System Development and Management 15 credits

All organisations are required to effectively manage the quality of their goods and services, and that of the processes and systems that produce or deliver them. This course introduces the key principles of quality systems and their control and management. This includes core definitions, key theories, relevant standards, documentation requirements, and associated tools, methods and principles for managing and controlling quality.

Restrictions: 287730

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Part Two

Schedule C: Research courses

Coursework Pathway (Choose 45 credits from)
Choose 45 credits from
Course code: 218810 Research Report 45 credits

A detailed examination of a specific researchable topic within the field of construction. The course provides the opportunity for the student to demonstrate independence and originality to solve a construction-related problem requiring analytical, design and experimental effort.

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Thesis Pathway (Choose 90 credits from)
Choose 90 credits from
Course code: 218828 Thesis 90 Credit Part 1 45 credits

A supervised and guided independent study resulting in a published work.

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Course code: 218829 Thesis 90 Credit Part 2 45 credits

A supervised and guided independent study resulting in a published work.

Corequisites: 218828

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Course code: 218830 Thesis 90 credits

A detailed examination of a specific researchable topic within the field of construction. The course provides the opportunity for the student to demonstrate independence and originality to solve a construction-related problem requiring analytical, design and experimental effort.

View full course details

Fees and scholarships

Fees, student loans and free fees scheme

Your tuition fees may be different depending on the courses you choose. Your exact fees will show once you have chosen your courses.

There will also be some compulsory non-tuition fees and for some courses, there may also be charges for things such as study resources, software, trips and contact workshops.

Already know which courses you're going to choose?

You can view fees for the courses that make up your qualification on the course details pages.

Student loans (StudyLink) and Fees Free scheme

You may be eligible for a student loan to help towards paying your fees.

The New Zealand Government offers fees-free tertiary study for eligible domestic students. Find out more about the scheme and your eligibility on the Fees Free website. To use the site's eligibility checking tool, you will need your National Student Number.

Current and returning Massey students can find their National Student Number in the student portal.

Fees disclaimer

This information is for estimation purposes only. Actual fees payable will be finalised on confirmation of enrolment. Unless otherwise stated, all fees shown are quoted in New Zealand dollars and include Goods and Services Tax, if any. Before relying on any information on these pages you should also read the University's Disclaimer Notice.

Careers and job opportunities

You will be in demand

There is a shortage of qualified graduates with skills in this area - there is over $90 billion of construction work (covering both building and infrastructure work) to be done in New Zealand alone over the next 30 years. Demand in many countries beyond New Zealand is even bigger.

Massive growth in the construction industry

The construction industry is a significant contributor to any country’s economy. It is often used as a catalyst industry to spur further economic growth – because it has a ‘multiplier’ or knock-on effect on the rest of the economy.
The New Zealand construction industry is likely to face acute shortages. Consider the following.

In Auckland, there have been suggestions that with the estimated population growth of close to a further million people, another 300,000 new homes need to be built. Assuming each new house costs $300,000 to build, that translates to $90 billion worth of work.

We then have to add to that:

  • the costs of the rail links proposed for Auckland
  • a second harbour crossing (tunnel or bridge)
  • expansion of the dedicated northern bus way
  • additional commercial projects (shopping and offices) to cater for the additional population
  • additional recreational projects including the new pool at North Harbour Stadium and the AUT Millennium Institute of Sports and Health expansions including another Olympic-size pool
  • the need to work out costs of construction for insurance valuation purposes
  • the need to strengthen buildings that do not comply with minimum earthquake requirements
  • the extensive rectification of leaky buildings around Auckland.

Going beyond Auckland, we need to add the costs of construction work projected to grow in Hamilton, Wellington’s post-earthquake repairs, and the major Christchurch rebuild.

Earn more

A 2017 Ministry of Education publication The post-study earnings and destinations of young domestic graduates, found that in New Zealand:

  • young master’s graduates earn more than one and a half times more than the national median (five years after study)
  • earnings and employment rates increase with the level of qualification completed
  • five years after completion, the median earnings of young master’s graduates are 15% higher than for those with a bachelor’s degree.

What our students say

“My employer encouraged me to further my study in construction. I chose Massey’s Master of Construction as it allowed me to study via distance and block courses while I worked, making for a manageable workload.”
Gareth Arnold

Master of Construction