Bachelor of Information Sciences – BInfSc

Exciting careers are available in software development, business analysis, project management. Massey provides you with the technical skills and knowledge to take your place in the fastest-growing industry in the world.

Type of qualification

Bachelor's degree

Level of study

Undergraduate study

An undergraduate qualification is usually the first one you study.

NZQF level 7

Our courses follow the New Zealand Qualification Framework (NZQF) levels.

Find out more about NZQF levels

Time to complete

3 year(s) full-time (360 credits)
Up to 8 years part-time
Part-time available

International students

International students are not New Zealand citizens or residents.

Definition of New Zealand citizens and residents

Open to international students on campus in New Zealand, or studying on-line out

Study a Bachelor of Information Sciences – BInfSc

Flexible and unique study options

Massey is the only university in New Zealand to offer five ITC-related majors in the same degree. This allows you to mix and match courses to suit your strengths and interests. Enjoy smaller classes with individual attention from lecturers. Experience the first-year courses and still be able to change your major at the start of the second year. Include a double major or a minor (in any subject) or New Zealand’s only minor in Games Programming.

Generous cross credit system

Massey transfers credits from a wide range of previous study. If you have a previous diploma in any area of ITC, it is highly likely that you will be awarded credits towards your BInfSc.

Applied and technical knowledge

Massey teaches students the skills and knowledge needed to succeed in the software industry. Topics include:

  • mobile applications
  • graphics and games programming
  • networks and security
  • web development and internet programming
  • artificial intelligence.
  • machine learning and data wrangling. 

Massey is the only university in New Zealand specialising in the C and C++ programming languages that are highly sought after by employers. You’ll also learn Java, Python, SQL and other languages.

Join the real world of software development

Massey has close ties with the innovative and rapidly expanding software companies based in North Auckland. These companies offer opportunities for internships, industry projects, holiday work and possible employment offers. Students are also involved in creating websites and applications for charities and voluntary organisations.

Further study

Once you graduate you can move on to advanced study in the Postgraduate Diploma in Information Sciences (one year of 120 credits in taught courses) or the Master of Information Sciences (180 credits including 120 credits of taught courses and a major professional project).

A BInfSc is a good fit if you:

  • think logically and analytically
  • are interested in learning technical and applied skills
  • look forward to a challenging and rewarding career in the software industry.

Entry requirements

Admission to Massey

All students must meet university entrance requirements to be admitted to the University.

Specific requirements

There are no specific entry requirements for this qualification, outside of university admission regulations. 

If you have excellent achievements in NCEA and prior programming experience (through the successful completion of courses and participation in competitions like STAR, NCSS or the ACM SPPC) you will be considered for direct entry into second-year computer science courses. You may also be eligible to participate in software development projects.

English language requirements

To study this qualification you must meet Massey University's English language standards.

Prior learning, credit and exemptions

For information on prior learning, exemptions and transfer of credit or other questions:

English language skills

If you need help with your English language skills before you start university, see our English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses.

Official regulations

To understand what you need to study and must complete to graduate read the official rules and regulations for this qualification.

You should read these together with all other relevant Statutes and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.

Returning students

For returning students, there may be changes to the majors and minors available and the courses you need to take. Go to the section called ‘Transitional Provisions’ in the Regulations to find out more.

In some cases the qualification or specialisation you enrolled in may no longer be taking new enrolments, so may not appear on these web pages. To find information on the regulations for these qualifications go to the Massey University Calendar.

Please contact us through the Get advice button on this page if you have any questions.

Structure of the Bachelor of Information Sciences

First year for a full-time student usually consists of 8 courses.  Take electives** to get the total number of courses to 8.  Make sure you include courses that are prerequisites for the next level of courses you wish to study.  You can change your major up until the start of your second year and it is a good idea to keep your options open by taking courses such that you are ready to move on to several different majors.  In the first year of study, you should take the following courses:

  1. 158100 Introductory Concepts for Information Technology
  2. 158120 Fundamental Information Technologies
  3. 247112 Science and Sustainability for ICT (or 247113)
  4. A Statistics course (161111 Applied Statistics or 161122 Statistics)
  5. 159.100 Programming for Engineering and Technology or 159101 Technical Programming I
  6. A second programming course (159102 is required for Computer Science, Data Science, Software Engineering).*  Or you could take an elective.**
  7. A Mathematics course – (160105 or 160102 or 160101 is required for Computer Science, Data Science, Software Engineering).*  Or you could take an elective.**
  8. 157151 or an elective course from any subject.**

* Ensure that you have selected the correct courses for your major: Computer Science, Data Science and Software Engineering require [159100 or 159101], [159102]  and a maths course. Information Technology and Information Systems may require 157151 Living and Working with Technology, and do not require the second programming course or the maths course.

** Elective courses: Any course from any subject (including the courses listed above). Some elective courses may be available in Summer School.  If you are interested in taking a minor subject there may be required 100-level courses for that minor.

In the second year, you must take at least four 200-level courses for each major.  In the third year, you must take at least four 300-level courses for the major and also take 158345.  Double majors or minors will require additional courses.

Typical pattern for the Bachelor of Information Sciences

Core courses These courses are a compulsory part of your qualification.

Major courses Choose from a selection of courses appropriate for your specialisation.

Elective courses Follow your interests. Your qualification may have selection guidelines for elective courses.

Year one
247112 Science and Sustainability for ICT
159100 Programming for Engineering and Technology or
159101 Technical Programming I 
161111 Applied Statistics or
161122 Statistics
159102 Technical Programming II 
160101 Calculus or 160102 Algebra or
160105 Methods of Mathematics or Elective
158100 Concepts for Information Technology or
Elective
158120 Fundamental Information Technologies or
Elective
157151 Living and Working with Technology or
Elective
Year two
200-level major course
200-level major course
200-level major course
200-level major course
Elective or
200-level major course
Elective or
200-level major course
Elective
Elective
Year three
158345 Professionalism in the Information Sciences
300-level major course
300-level major course
300-level major capstone course or
Elective (depending on major)
Elective or
300-level major course
Elective or
300-level major course
Elective
Elective

Courses are each worth 15 credits.

Computer Science, Information Systems and Information Technology majors are 120 credits.

Data Science major is 135 credits.

Software Engineering major is 165 credits.

Courses and specialisations

Key terms

Courses
Each qualification has its own specific set of courses. Some universities call these papers. You enrol in courses after you get accepted into Massey.
Course code
Each course is numbered using 6 digits. The fourth number shows the level of the course. For example, in course 219206, the fourth number is a 2, so it is a 200-level course (usually studied in the second year of full-time study).
Credits
Each course is worth a number of credits. You combine courses (credits) to meet the total number of credits needed for your qualification.
Specialisations
Some qualifications let you choose what subject you'd like to specialise in. Your major or endorsement is what you will take the majority of your courses in.

Credit summary

360 credits

  • Core courses – 90 credits
  • Major courses (depending on chosen major) – 120‑165 credits
  • Electives (depending on chosen major) – 105‑150 credits

Ensure that overall, you have:

  • Not more than 165 credits at 100 level
  • At least 75 credits at 300 level

You could replace some electives with a minor.

Course planning key

Prerequisites
Courses that need to be completed before moving onto a course at the next level. For example, a lot of 200-level courses have 100-level prerequisite courses.
Corequisites
Courses that must be completed at the same time as another course are known as corequisite courses.
Restrictions
Some courses are restricted against each other because their content is similar. This means you can only choose one of the offered courses to study and credit to your qualification.

Schedule A: Core courses

Choose 30 credits from
Course code: 158345 Professionalism in the Information Sciences 15 credits

This course provides an advanced study of social and professional issues in the information sciences. It will involve the exploration, through appropriate resources, of issues relevant to practitioners, including ethics, legal issues, communication, teamwork and professional contexts.

Prerequisites: 1572xx or 1582xx or 1592xx

View full course details
Course code: 247112 Science and Sustainability for ICT 15 credits

A project-based course developing students’ practical skills for critical thinking, analysis and collaboration to address IT-related sustainability challenges in Aotearoa New Zealand. Students will learn to communicate effectively with users, clients, colleagues and managers in the IT industry. The course includes an exploration of how the Treaty of Waitangi underpins a partnership between Pākehā and Māori, focussing on ways in which IT can be guided by Tikanga Māori (including culture, ethics and knowledge systems).

Restrictions: 247177, 141111, 141112, 228111, 228112, 247155, 119155, 246102, 247111, 247113, 247114

View full course details
Choose 15 credits from
Course code: 159100 Programming for Engineering and Technology 15 credits

This course provides an introduction to computer programming for Technology and Engineering disciplines. The language is C++ which is a "real world" language heavily used in games, real-time applications and the control of devices. The course guides students through all the steps needed to write, compile and debug simple C++ programs with lots of practical examples. No previous programming experience is required.

Restrictions: 159101

View full course details
Course code: 159101 Applied Programming 15 credits

The focus of this course is on problem solving and the design of logical and efficient programming solutions. It is an applied course with an emphasis on software construction using basic algorithmic methods and simple data structures. The course introduces the C++ programming language and is an essential preparation for advanced programming courses.

Restrictions: 159100

View full course details
Choose 15 credits from
Course code: 161111 Applied Statistics 15 credits

Statistical literacy, the ability to understand and reason with statistics and data, is becoming increasingly important as our world becomes more and more data-rich. This course focuses on developing statistical literacy in real-world contexts. We teach students to use software (Excel and RStudio) to summarise, display and analyse data. We explore data collection techniques including sampling methods and experimental design. We introduce statistical inference methods (confidence intervals, hypothesis testing and regression) with an emphasis on communicating results in context.

Restrictions: 115101, 161101, 161120, 161122, 161130, 161140

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Course code: 161122 Statistics 15 credits

Statistical literacy and data collection. Descriptive statistics and the interpretation of data, probability, random variables and probability distributions, sampling and estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, use of R software.

Restrictions: 115101, 161101, 161111, 161120, 161130, 161140

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For the major in Computer Science or for the joint major in Software Engineering (Choose 15 credits from)

Choose 15 credits from
Course code: 159102 Computer Science and Programming 15 credits

This course advances the programming knowledge to include abstract data types, recursion, pointers, and the foundations of object-oriented programming. Foundational Computer Science topics are also covered including bits, bytes, twos complement arithmetic, gates, logic circuits and an introduction to assembler programming.

Prerequisites: 159100 or 159101

View full course details

For the majors in Computer Science or Data Science, or for the joint major in Software Engineering (Choose 15 credits from)

Choose 15 credits from
Course code: 160101 Calculus 15 credits

A course focusing on the fundamental techniques and applications of calculus including differentiation and integration of functions of one real variable, differential equations, numerical methods, and an introduction to power series with applications to mathematical models. 160.101, alongside 160.102, forms a foundation for further study in mathematics. It is essential for students intending to study Mathematics, Physics, Food Technology or Engineering, or for anyone who wants a strong mathematical component to their degree.

Restrictions: 160112, 160133, 228172

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Course code: 160102 Algebra 15 credits

A course focusing on the fundamental techniques and applications of linear algebra including vector and matrix algebra, vector representation of lines and planes, projections, Gaussian elimination, eigenvectors and complex numbers. 160.102, alongside 160.101, forms a foundation for further study in mathematics. It is essential for students intending to study Mathematics, Physics, Food Technology or Engineering, or for anyone who wants a strong mathematical component to their degree.

Restrictions: 160112, 160133, 228172

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Course code: 160105 Methods of Mathematics 15 credits

An introductory course designed to increase the confidence of students in handling mathematical concepts and skills. Content includes algebraic skills, functions and graphs, and an introduction to calculus.

Restrictions: 160101, 160102, 160103, 160111, 160112, 160131, 160132, 160133, 228171, 228172

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For the majors in Information Systems or Information Technology (Choose at least 30 credits from)

Choose at least 30 credits from
Course code: 157151 Living and Working with Technology 15 credits

An introductory study of the roles and applications of information systems in organisations and society.

Restrictions: 115107, 157150, 157100

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Course code: 158100 Information Technology Principles 15 credits

This course introduces students to concepts and theories in preparation of advanced Information Technology (IT) courses. Students gain foundations in programming, non-relational databases, user interface design, system analysis and testing, along with the impact of IT on society. Hands-on explorations form an important component of this course.

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Course code: 158120 Web-based IT Fundamentals 15 credits

In this course, students study how key information technology components combine to form complex information technology solutions. This includes analysis and experimentation with relational databases, web technologies, programming and networking.

View full course details

Schedule B: Specialisations

Majors

Some qualifications let you choose what subject you'd like to specialise in. Your major or endorsement is what you will take the majority of your courses in.

You must select a major. Don’t worry about possibly selecting the wrong major because you can still change your major at the start of the second year.  Select two majors if you would like a double major.

Note that Software Engineering may not be part of a double major.

Minors

Completing a minor is optional.  A minor must be in a different subject from your major and must not share any courses with your major. 

If you study towards a Bachelor of Information Sciences, you may choose a minor from any University undergraduate degree that has recognised minors. If the minor is from another degree the regulations of that qualification will apply.

Bachelor of Information Sciences minors

Most BInfSc majors are available as minors (the exception is Software Engineering). The following are also available as minor-only topics. See the BInfSc regulations for requirements.

Business

Gain a broad introduction to a range of core business skills.

Games programming

Massey is the only university where you can take courses that focus on the programming of computer games. You will gain the technical skills sought after by the industry including working with game engines.

  • Business
  • Computer Science
  • Data Science
  • Games Programming
  • Information Systems
  • Information Technology

Fees and scholarships

Fees, student loans and free fees scheme

Your tuition fees may be different depending on the courses you choose. Your exact fees will show once you have chosen your courses.

There will also be some compulsory non-tuition fees and for some courses, there may also be charges for things such as study resources, software, trips and contact workshops.

Already know which courses you're going to choose?

You can view fees for the courses that make up your qualification on the course details pages.

Student loans (StudyLink) and Fees Free scheme

You may be eligible for a student loan to help towards paying your fees.

The New Zealand Government offers fees-free tertiary study for eligible domestic students. Find out more about the scheme and your eligibility on the Fees Free website. To use the site's eligibility checking tool, you will need your National Student Number.

Current and returning Massey students can find their National Student Number in the student portal.

Fees disclaimer

This information is for estimation purposes only. Actual fees payable will be finalised on confirmation of enrolment. Unless otherwise stated, all fees shown are quoted in New Zealand dollars and include Goods and Services Tax, if any. Before relying on any information on these pages you should also read the University's Disclaimer Notice.

Careers and job opportunities

There is a huge demand for people with information sciences skills.

Massey Bachelor of Information Sciences graduates continue to find employment even during global recessions when graduates in other fields struggled.

Today there are more employment opportunities in information communication technology (ICT) than any other sector in New Zealand. The same often applies internationally. 

Don’t take it from us - take a look at the SEEK website – large numbers of ICT jobs in New Zealand are advertised at any time on this website.

Employers often require graduates to sit practical tests in addition to interviews. The Massey emphasis on applied knowledge and skills enables Massey graduates to perform well in these tests.

Careers for Information Sciences graduates:

  • software developer
  • software architect
  • software engineer
  • analyst-programmer
  • systems programmer
  • systems analyst
  • business analyst
  • software tester
  • user requirements engineer
  • database developer or administrator
  • networks and systems administrator
  • project manager
  • data scientist
  • web developer.

Accreditations and rankings

Institute of IT Professionals New Zealand (IITP) accreditation

Massey's Bachelor of Information Sciences is accredited by IT Professionals New Zealand. Accreditation ensures that courses are relevant to the industry.

Learn more